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Permatex Promotes Key Marketing Personnel

first_imgHARTFORD, Conn. — Permatex has announced two key promotions in its product management and marketing teams. Diane Nesprido has been named senior product manager and Lauren Mencarini was promoted to creative director. Both managers are veteran Permatex employees with long-standing service to the company. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Nesprido is responsible for Permatex’s product management and marketing departments. In addition to her product management duties, Nesprido is also in charge of overall marketing communications, including new product introductions, advertising campaigns, promotional support programs, marketing research and trade shows. Nesprido has been with Permatex since 2003, and was most recently the product manager for Fast Orange Hand Cleaners/ Hand Care/Gloves, No Touch appearance products, DIY repair kits, NOS maintenance and performance additives, Spray Nine Cleaners and the Permatex Silicone Gasketing and Adhesive and Sealants lines. She also served as the international market manager for Permatex International. Prior to Permatex, Nesprido worked for News America Marketing, where she was a senior marketing coordinator and retail account coordinator. She holds a bachelor of science degree from University of Connecticut and is currently working on her MBA at University of Hartford. Mencarini has more than 20 years experience holding several graphics positions within in-house corporate marketing communications groups. Before her promotion, Mencarini headed Permatex’s creative department for the past 10 years as the company’s design manager/art director. Prior to Permatex, Mencarini was a senior designer at Loctite Corp., Permatex’s former parent company, and held design positions with Corometrics Medical Systems Inc. Advertisement Over the years, Mencarini has helped the Permatex team capture several design and creative awards for brand and identity development, advertising, packaging, Internet/online and cataloging programs. She holds a bachelor of fine arts degree in graphic design from the University of Hartford (Hartford Art School) and is a member of the Connecticut Art Directors Club.last_img read more

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Girls Basketball Preview, Part II

first_imgPierson/Bridgehampton’s Chastin Giles leaps up to the net in a game against Southold last season. Independent/Gordon M. GrantTen Pierson/Bridgehampton seniors know this season is their last chance to make something happen.Last year, the Whalers went 11-8 and were upset at home in a first-round playoff loss to Stony Brook. Pierson graduated three seniors, but only one started a handful of games. With eight returning, and two new upperclassmen joining the team, the girls seem primed for success.“We’ve got a lot of girls that have been playing together for a while,” head coach Kevin Barron said. “These girls know that they have a big opportunity. With 10 seniors, they know this is their last shot.”The League VI returners can shoot, according to their coach. The team brings back top scorers in senior shooting guard Katie Kneeland (267 points last season), and junior point guard Chastin Giles (231 points).While the girls have been playing together for years, changes across the court have forced the Whalers to find new synergy.“We’ve changed our offense to be more of a spread-type offense compared to previous years,” Barron said. “It’s difficult when you’re asking girls to step outside their comfort zone. We put the girls in different positions. Since we have a lot of height, we think we can make some mismatches that way.”Two girls were also pulled up from the junior varsity team, including freshman Sofia Mancino, who had some success on the 10-3 girls volleyball team that fell to Mattituck in the Suffolk County championship.“We really like what she’s doing right now,” Barron said. “She’s another girl that can handle the ball.”The coach is unsure what to expect when facing Southampton and Hampton Bays, because the teams haven’t competed against one another in a few years. He said he especially can’t judge them based of their records from last season, because they were up against stiffer competition. Barron said facing Mattituck will continue to be a challenge, despite the Tuckers graduating all five starters. Mattituck’s junior varsity team had a strong season last year, so the Tuckers’ “rebuild” might be more of a reload.“They may not lose a beat,” Barron said. “We’re expecting them to be one of the top teams in what I think is going to be a competitive league. It’ll be up for grabs.”Southold/Greenport (4-12 last season) also returns to the league. The Settlers lost five and returned six, including freshman Adrine Demirciyan, who scored 106 points as an eighth-grader.Head coach Skip Gehring said earlier this year that Greenport coaches had tipped him off to his young talent.“The coaches at Greenport were saying, ‘Don’t let her play JV. Get her right on your varsity team,’” he recalled of his five-foot-five point guard, adding she could be a 2000-point scorer by the time she graduates.Mattituck head coach Steve Van Dood said playing a Class B/C schedule will help his young team. Two of the girls returning, senior center Julie Seifert (66 points) and junior guard Mackenzie Hoeg (90 points), came off the bench and closed out games for the Tuckers last season.“Mackenzie Hoeg is a very good ball handler and has a good court presence. She moves the ball well, distributes,” Van Dood said. “Julie Seifert is a good rebounder and has a good inside presence. She’s a leader, both on and off the court. She does a good job for us.”The Tuckers (19-4 last season) took a big blow in the scoring department, when their all-time scoring leader for both boys and girls, Liz Dwyer, graduated.“We need girls to step up to the basket and break down defenders and make other people play them,” Van Dood said. “I’m hoping players step up and do that.”Helping to fill that void for the defending Suffolk County champions will be freshman Emily Nicholson.“She has a knack for getting to the basket and she’s learning to shoot,” the coach said. “She’s working on getting shots off quicker and getting stronger with the ball and off the ball. She’s progressing quickly, and I think she’s going to do well for us.”Van Dood sees the team’s toughness and defense making up for the lack of consistent buckets, but said he sees his Tuckers boasting an even bigger strength.“Our willingness to learn,” he said. “The way they listen and take what we’re teaching them and incorporate it into practice. They work hard. They’re going to get better and better as the season progresses.”The coach sees Babylon being tough because the Panthers are also a Class B school. Van Dood is also unsure of Southampton and Hampton Bays, but said he sees Pierson as being Mattituck’s biggest league rival.“There’s a lot of leadership here,” Barron said. “I said to them they all have a lot of experience in different areas of athletics, especially being in the postseason against major competition. We have girls that have played on the championship field hockey team, girls that have played on the championship volleyball team, cross country team, a lot of them have been to states — and they can really make something happen.”This version was updated to correctly identify the team that Pierson/Bridgehampton lost to in the first round of last year’s playoffs. Sharelast_img read more

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DWF reveals £12.6m spend on listing in maiden results

first_imgInternational firm DWF has revealed that it spent £12.6m on costs related to its listing on the London Stock Exchange earlier this year. Annual accounts for 2018/19, covering the year to 30 April, confirm the cost of going public reduced profit before tax by 42% to £12.3m.DWF said much of the cost incurred was driven by the complexity of the project, including detailed regulatory work required in each jurisdiction in which it operates.Restructuring work was undertaken immediately prior to the initial public offering to ensure the group structure was ‘robust’ and further work was needed to transition the company’s financial reporting, systems and controls from an LLP model to a corporate one.DWF became the first existing law firm to float on the main market of the London Stock Exchange in March this year.Overall during the year, net revenue has increased 15% to £272.4m, with gross profit up 16% to £145.5m, today’s results show. Andrew Leaitherland said the results mark the end of a milestone year for DWF and reflect an uplift across all four divisions of the business. ‘We have made significant progress against strategy, taking meaningful strides towards our medium-term targets, and expect our diversified and differentiated business model to continue driving long-term sustainable growth.’DWF has said it will, from 2020, target a dividend payout ratio of up to 70% of profit after tax. For 2019, the group was listed for only six weeks of the financial year, so the final dividend will be 1p per share, around £3m in total.Group net assets have increased from £5.3m in 2018 to £41.8m this year. This is due to a 16.5% increase in gross lock-up to £21.5m, an £18.8m reduction in net debt and £18.4 net repayments to members.DWF now has 2,715 employees, up from 2,656 in 2018.Shares rose marginally today to 122.5p. On listing in March the price was 127p.last_img read more

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CSX agrees short line spin-offs

first_imgUSA: CSX Transportation has reached agreement to sell almost 300 km of railway in Alabama and Georgia to Denver-based HGS Railway Holdings, following its announcement earlier this year that up to one-third of its total network was being reviewed for possible closure or sale.HGS has established two wholly-owned subsidiaries to acquire two lines, which would continue to be leased to the OmniTRAX short line subsidiaries that currently operate them under lease from CSX. HGS-ATN is acquiring 194 km of CSX-owned trackage linking Birmingham with Alabama City and Guntersville, which is operated by Alabama & Tennessee River Railway. HGS-FCR is purchasing the Fulco Branch, which comprises 89 track-km of industrial spurs west of Atlanta, Georgia, operated by Fulton County Railway.HGS applied to the Surface Transportation Board on April 4 for the lines to be redesignated as Class III operations. Because HGS-ATN and HGS-FCR are not Class I carriers, and there would be no significant change to the volume of rail traffic being handled, the company argued that this would exempt the transaction from prior approval by the STB. HGS Railway Holdings President & CEO Kevin Shube said the group ‘intends to reduce overhead expenses and co-ordinate personnel policies and practices of its two rail carrier subsidiaries’, but would not seek to integrate the two businesses.last_img read more

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Educational investments in Castle Bruce underscored

first_img Tweet 72 Views   2 comments Share Sharing is caring! EducationLocalNewsPrimarySecondary Educational investments in Castle Bruce underscored by: – December 31, 2012center_img Share Share Castle Bruce MP Johnson DrigoGovernment’s investments in educating the children of the Castle Bruce constituency have been underscored as significant by the Parliamentary Representative for the Castle Bruce Constituency Johnson Drigo.Drigo spoke to this when he addressed the nation during his Christmas message.The MP said much attention has been given to upgrading educational facilities in his constituency.“We continue to invest in our children. In 2012 we saw upgrade to the Castle Bruce Secondary School. We are currently investing well over one hundred thousand dollars on the Castle Bruce Primary School. Two of our preschools are fully integrated into the Castle Bruce Primary School with two classes being upgraded to meet the requirement of ECD learning centers. “Government will continue to assist our students to meet the cost of transportation, uniforms, text books, college tuition, CXC fees as well as the school feeding programme, all in an effort to ensure that no child is left behind,” he stated.With an effective learning environment now in place, the Parliamentary Representative lamented that the onus is now on parents and care givers to apply the appropriate parenting and nurturing skills to their children.“I say to you the parents and care givers of my constituency, the Castle Bruce Constituency, all of the strategies for an effective learning environment are in place, the challenge is how to apply the appropriate parenting and nurturing skills to your children. “The ideas of transforming our communities by holistically educating our people must remain our core principle, our Government understands that and continues to invest heavily on our behalf, let’s make the best use of these opportunities.”Mr. Drigo also revealed that since 2010 over twenty students from his constituency have been enrolled in or travelled to universities overseas to pursue degrees in a number of fields. He said most of them received full scholarships while others were partially sponsored by the Government of Dominica.Government Information Servicelast_img read more

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Alliance Francaise condemns Charlie Hedbo attack

first_img 285 Views   one comment Share Share LocalNews Alliance Francaise condemns Charlie Hedbo attack by: – January 9, 2015 Tweetcenter_img The Alliance Francaise, the French Consular Agency, the French community in Dominica and friends of France would like to express their moral support to the families of the 12 victims and 4 seriously injured persons working at the French magazine CHARLIE HEBDO in Paris. The outrageous massacre took place on Wednesday 7th January 2015 at the headquarters of the satirical magazine.The gunmen took the lives of famous journalists, cartoonists and policemen. It is an alarming attack on the freedom of the press, freedom of expression and therefore a threat to democracy .Charlie Hebdo’s guiding principles are: “THE PEN IS MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORD”…and “FREEDOM IS A UNIVERSAL RIGHT”.Thus, in Dominica, we also rally the worldwide slogan of solidarity:#WE ARE CHARLIE, #NOU SE CHARLIE, #NOUS SOMMES CHARLIE Share Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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New CAST paper assesses the impact of public agricultural research

first_imgWith global challenges mounting, it is a crucial time to examine the role research plays in our economic, social and political well-being. In this new Commentary from the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST), Investing in a Better Future through Public Agricultural Research, a team of respected scholars provides objective, science-based insights into the state of U.S. investments in public agricultural research. The authors look at important, timely issues:• The rates of return for agricultural research.• The question of who should fund research and how.• The consequences if research lags during this time of economic uncertainty.• The implications resulting from private research growing faster than public research.• The best methods for funding public agricultural research.advertisementadvertisementAgricultural research is a low-cost source of future agricultural output, but advances in the frontiers of science are difficult and uncertain. The authors contend that, “With funding delays, world food prices will rise more rapidly than otherwise projected during the next 40 years.”Dr. Wallace Huffman, distinguished professor of economics at Iowa State University, chaired the task force of notable scientists and researchers who drew from a wide base of information and included helpful charts and reference citations in their work. Their Commentary will be of interest to the Congress (for funding), the administration (for initiatives), and the public (for insight). Although the authors note that all research involves “uncertainty factors,” they conclude with a positive assertion: “Larger future investments in public agricultural research can be expected to provide large social benefits relative to costs and to provide a better future for people of the United States and the world.”Dr. John Bonner, CAST executive vice president/CEO, concludes: “CAST delivers science and technology information regarding healthy and productive plants, animals, people, and the planet. We are pleased to contribute this excellent, frank assessment of where we are and where we need to be to establish and sustain the health and abundance of world agriculture.”The full text of Investing in a Better Future through Public Agricultural Research (Commentary QTA2011-1, 12 pp.) may be accessed free of charge on the CAST website, along with many of CAST’s other scientific publications. PD—From CAST news releaseadvertisementlast_img read more

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I2R Nanowave Introduces New Electronically Tunable Filter Technology

first_imgI2R Nanowave has released a new rapidly tunable electronic filtering technology that can be used to develop high pass, low pass, band pass and band stop filter topologies with high Q, and deep rejection bands.The INW-ETF electronically tunable filter (ETF) is an electronic scanning filter capable of agile frequency selection over multi GHz bandwidths. It is ideal for signal analysis, signal discrimination and post-filtering applications. The filter’s bandwidth and stop band rejection can be customized based on application. It features sub-100uS tuning time with greater than 50 dB stop band rejection at X band and a 3 dB pass band of less than 200 kHz. Click here to learn more.last_img read more

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The Coach Shinnick Show – Episode 1

first_imgPrint Friendly Version Season 2, Episode 1 of the Coach Shinnick Show. This week, Tommy Thrall talks with #UWFFB head coach Pete Shinnick and offensive coordinator Jammie Deese, and we take a look at a revamped #UWFVB squad. #GoArgoslast_img

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Twenty20 World Cup organizers hopeful for successful tournament despite potential clash with other sports

first_imgWith both the Australian Football League (AFL) and National Rugby League (NRL) seasons suspended due to the pandemic, they may now clash with the Twenty20 World Cup when they resume.”In the event they have extended seasons…we still think the World Cup is a really strong proposition that might not come here again for 10 or 20 years,” Nick Hockley, CEO of the organizing committee, told Australian Associated Press.”People love a World Cup. Cricket is Australia’s national sport… and T20 is the format that appeals to the broadest possible demographic,” he said.”We’re very encouraged already by the take up in terms of ticket sales.”The women’s tournament proved a big success, with host Australia beating India in the March 8 final to defend its title.The organizers expect the men’s tournament to replicate that success despite uncertainty around it.The governing International Cricket Council (ICC) has maintained there is no change in its plans, and Hockley hoped they would not require any either.”We’re wanting to give ourselves the best possible chance of going ahead as planned, so there’s no imminent or quick decision,” he said.”Hopefully it’s all resolved and we go ahead. In the event that it isn’t completely resolved, we are looking at all the different scenarios. Which is only prudent,” he added. Your news needs your supportSince the early stages of the COVID-19 crisis, The Japan Times has been providing free access to crucial news on the impact of the novel coronavirus as well as practical information about how to cope with the pandemic. Please consider subscribing today so we can continue offering you up-to-date, in-depth news about Japan. Melbourne – Organizers expect this year’s Twenty20 World Cup to be a success even if it has to vie with Australian rules football and rugby league for viewers due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the head of the organizing committee said on Sunday.The Oct. 18-Nov. 15 tournament was slotted into Australia’s sports calendar between the end of the football season and the beginning of summer cricket to draw maximum attention. Australia, covid-19, Twenty20 World Cup KEYWORDS IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5 The Sydney Cricket Ground stands closed during a partial lockdown imposed due to the coronavirus in Sydney on Saturday. | BLOOMBERG GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMES RELATED PHOTOSlast_img read more

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