Category: pvsohyir

East Penn Promotes Donna Snyder to VP of Marketing and Advertising

first_imgLSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. LYON STATION, PA — East Penn Manufacturing Co. has promoted Donna Snyder from director to vice president of marketing and advertising. In this role, Snyder’s responsibilities include leading the company’s marketing and advertising division and developing and implementing marketing programs and strategies for the company and its customers. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Snyder joined East Penn in 1983 as a graphic designer. She graduated from Kutztown University acquiring a bachelor of fine arts degree with a concentration in communication design. Since then she has been promoted to assistant advertising manager, manager and director. Snyder also earned a master of business administration from Eastern University in 2001. For more information about East Penn, go to: www.dekabatteries.com. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business. last_img read more

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Its a mystery

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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For many older Americans, costs rise under GOP health plan

first_img SHARE Do you see a typo or an error? Let us know. Published: March 19, 2017 1:30 PM EDT Updated: March 19, 2017 11:45 AM EDT Author: AP center_img For many older Americans, costs rise under GOP health plan NEW RINGGOLD, Pa. (AP) Among the groups hardest hit by the Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act is one that swung for Donald Trump during last year’s presidential race – older Americans who have not yet reached Medicare age.Many of those who buy their own health insurance stand to pay a lot more for their coverage. That is especially true for the nearly 3.4 million older Americans who have enrolled through the government marketplaces, many of whom receive generous federal subsidies through the health care law enacted under former President Barack Obama.Health care experts predict those older adults will end up buying skimpier plans with lower coverage and higher deductibles because that’s all they will be able to afford. The Republican plan replaces the subsidies in the Affordable Care Act, which mostly benefit low- and middle-income earners, with a flat tax credit that does not take into account income or local insurance prices.On top of that, the GOP plan allows insurers to charge older people five times what they charge younger customers, compared to three times under Obama’s health care law.The Republican plan is still evolving, and many GOP lawmakers have said they want to see changes that reduce the impact on older consumers before they can support it.Based on the current plan, an Associated Press analysis of data from the Kaiser Family Foundation shows older consumers, defined as those age 55 and older, would be disproportionately affected. They could lose thousands of dollars per year in government subsidies for health insurance.The AP analysis also found that on average, the counties with the strongest Trump support will see costs for older enrollees rise 50 percent more than the counties that had the least amount of support for Trump.“A lot of people just won’t be able to afford to pay it. A lot of people are going to drop out of the market altogether,” said Kaiser’s Cynthia Cox.That includes older voters who helped put Trump into office.Take Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, an economically struggling former coal-mining center where the New York billionaire won 70 percent of the vote in November.About 40 percent of Schuylkill County’s Affordable Care Act enrollees are 55 or older, more than 10 points higher than the national average. A 60-year-old making $30,000 annually here will pay roughly $8,750 more per year for coverage under the Republican plan moving through Congress, according to the AP analysis.“When it comes to food or insurance, it’s going to be an easy choice,” said Matt Strauss, a health insurance broker in New Ringgold, some of whose customers voted for Trump.Older Americans on both ends of the political spectrum say they are worried about what the future holds. Here are some of their stories:___Trump supporter and longtime Republican Robert Ruscoe, who runs a Florida liquidating business with his wife, said he is not feeling “warm and fuzzy” about the GOP health care plan.He went about five years without insurance because it was financially out of reach. When insurance became available through the Affordable Care Act, the couple was able to get a policy for about $350 per month, after a $700 monthly subsidy from the government.“It’s nice to be able to go the doctor whenever something comes up. It gives you a peace … especially when you get close to 60,” said Ruscoe, 57, of West Palm Beach.He said he didn’t hesitate to sign up through the Affordable Care Act, a program his party spent years vowing to dismantle.“It doesn’t matter who came up with it. It’s a good thing to be supporting across party lines,” he said.Worried about losing coverage, Ruscoe considered voting for a Democrat for the first time last November. But he ultimately placed his trust in Trump and the GOP.“Obamacare is eventually going to have to be fiscally sound. Otherwise it’s not going to stay,” Ruscoe said. “I figured (a replacement) was coming, anyway.”He said he wants Trump to know that having access to insurance matters.“That coverage made a big difference in a lot of people’s lives, just like me,” he said.___Anna Holloway of Norman, Oklahoma, who takes daily medication for an auto-immune disease, said she is fearful the GOP plan will price her out of the market for health insurance.“I am conscious of just how desperate this is,” said Holloway, 60, fighting back tears. “I try not to let myself feel this way, but to live this way with real terror, real fear that the universe is going to fall apart around me.”She takes home about $1,150 per month working four part-time jobs. That’s only $250 more than the monthly premium for a health care plan that includes Holloway and her 23-year-old daughter. Without the government subsidy that makes the policy affordable, she would have to drop it.The Kaiser analysis estimates a family plan in Norman under the current Republican proposal would cost as much as $20,000 more for someone in Holloway’s income and age bracket.“I’d go without health care. I would get sicker, and that would make it more difficult to work. I would eventually have to stop working,” said Holloway, a registered Democrat who voted for Hillary Clinton.Holloway said she has contemplated the possibility of selling her home and moving in with a family member in Virginia. She acknowledges sometimes feeling hopeless when she considers how losing her health care would affect her life.“I’m not suicidal, but there are times that I think of the damage that could be done to my daughter and her future if I have to eat up all my reserves and my house and all that I own,” she said.___The Affordable Care Act didn’t work for Wendy Kline, a hairstylist in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, who voted for Donald Trump.Kline tried buying a policy on the federal exchange but found she made a little too much money to qualify for a government subsidy. So she was stuck paying the market rate.Her policy jumped this year from $630 to $929 a month. As a result, the 61-year-old isn’t able to save much for retirement.“I try to put as much away as I can, but my health insurance is $30 less than my mortgage payment,” said Kline, who works two jobs.The GOP plan is a mixed bag for people like Kline. It gives some higher-income consumers the ability to get tax credits for coverage purchased off the exchange, but it also gives insurers the right to charge older customers like her more than they can under the current law.Kline voted for Trump hoping he would be able to work with Congress “to make it affordable for everyone, across the board.”She said she still has hope, but is increasingly skeptical.“I’m so tired of the whole thing,” she said. “When they talk, I turn the television down because it just drives me crazy.”___Retired factory worker Bob Melton, 63, said the projected cost increases for older Americans mean he and his wife Tammy, 58, would be unable to continue to afford coverage. They now pay $225 a month after the subsidies they receive through the Affordable Care Act.He was staggered by a projection that the couple’s premiums could go up by nearly $17,000 under the GOP plan.“It’ll put me and my wife out – out of insurance. There’s just no way,” he said.Melton saw a doctor for the first time in 12 years after he and his wife bought a policy through the federal health insurance exchange in 2014. After three appointments and blood tests ruled out more serious ailments, Melton said he learned the nagging pain he suffered in his hands was caused by arthritis.The Meltons live in Morganton, North Carolina, about 75 miles northwest of Charlotte, in a county that has seen an exodus of manufacturing jobs. Trump won more than two-thirds of the vote here.Bob Melton himself used to be a staunch Republican. Now he blames Republicans in North Carolina for what he views as efforts to obstruct the Affordable Care Act from working as intended, by refusing to expand Medicaid coverage.“There’s no justification for it except for spite. That’s just the way I feel about it,” said Melton, who voted for Clinton.Although he’s grateful for his federally subsidized plan, Melton’s experience highlights the diminishing options that have plagued those trying to buy health insurance on the government exchanges established under the Obama reforms.Last year, Melton’s coverage cost only about $37 after subsidies through Coventry Health Care, a division of Aetna Inc., but the company has since dropped exchange offerings in the state.His current insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, is the only choice available, and his monthly premium is up nearly $200.last_img read more

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Foundation gala honors long-time Farmington area volunteer

first_img Farmington Voice Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window) The Farmington & Farmington Hills Foundation for Youth & Families (FFHFYF) annual Gala Dinner, held on May 17 at Steven Lelli’s on the Green, honored a long-time Farmington Hills volunteer and raised more than $30,000 to support local programs and organizations.Carol Greening, left, is pictured with FFHFYF Trustee Lynn Halton. (Contributed)Carol Greening received the 2019 Riley Award for Altruism, presented each year to a resident who has made a significant contribution to the communities of Farmington and Farmington Hills. Actively involved in many areas, Greening has volunteered with the CARES of Farmington Hills food pantry (formerly St Alexander’s food pantry), FAST, FFHFYF and the Farmington Area Interfaith Association.One of the beautiful centerpieces made by Visions Unlimited shows food items that go into backpacks for kids in need. (Contributed)Centerpieces were made by the students of Visions Unlimited and contained some of the food items sent home every week with eligible students through the Farmington Public Schools Bountiful Backpack Program, which is supported by FFHFYF.Judge Marla Parker, right, presented the Riley Award for Altruism to Carol Greening. (Contributed)FFHFYF has supported programs and providing funds to improve the quality of life for children, youth and families in need since 1995. To find out more about FFHFYF, the Bountiful Backpack Program, or the grant award cycle, call 248-426-1190 or write to admin@ffhfoundation.org.–Press release Reported bylast_img read more

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Bluetooth 5 to Double Speeds, Quadruple Range and Boost Data Capacity by 800%

first_imgThe Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) has announced that their next major release will be introduced some time in late 2016 or early 2017. This new release will be called Bluetooth 5 and will include significantly increased range, speed, and broadcast messaging capabilities. Extending range will deliver robust, reliable Internet of Things (IoT) connections that make full-home, building and outdoor use cases a reality. Higher speeds will send data faster and optimize responsiveness. Increasing broadcast capacity will propel the next generation of “connectionless” services like beacons and location-relevant information and navigation. These Bluetooth advancements open up more possibilities and enable SIG companies (over 30,000 member companies) to build an accessible, interoperable IoT.Mark Powell, executive director of the Bluetooth SIG said – “Bluetooth 5 will transform the way people experience the IoT by making it something that happens simply and seamlessly around them.” Increasing operation range will enable connections to IoT devices that extend far beyond the walls of a typical home, while increasing speed supports faster data transfers and software updates for devices. And now with the ability to broadcast a much richer set of information, Bluetooth 5 will make beacons, location awareness, and other connectionless services an even more relevant part of an effortless and seamless IoT experience.This new technology will quadruple range and double speed of low energy connections while increasing the capacity of connectionless data broadcasts by 800 percent. It achieves all this alongside its industry-leading low power performance. With the major boost in broadcast messaging capacity, the data being transferred will be richer, more intelligent. This will redefine the way Bluetooth devices transmit information, moving away from the app-paired-to-device model to a connectionless IoT where there is less need to download an app or connect the app to a device.There are over 8 billion Bluetooth products in use, and the enhancements in Bluetooth 5 and planned future Bluetooth technical advancements mean that Bluetooth will be in more than one-third of all installed IoT devices by 2020. According to a report by ABI Research, More than 371 million Bluetooth enabled beacons are projected to ship by 2020. With eight times the broadcast messaging capacity, Bluetooth 5 will further propel the adoption and deployment of beacons and location-based services in the home automation, enterprise, and industrial markets. In scenarios where contextual awareness like navigation and pin-point location are crucial – such as hassle-free airport navigation experiences, asset tracking of warehouse inventory, emergency response, even smart city infrastructure that helps the visually impaired be more mobile – Bluetooth 5 will send custom information people actually find useful in that moment without connection and application barriers.last_img read more

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Rugged Omni-directional Antennas from 824 to 960 MHz for Wireless Infrastructure

first_imgKP Performance Antennas, has released a new series of 900 MHz Omni-directional antennas that are ideal for utilities, SCADA and two-way communication.The new line of Omni antennas includes two models that operate over the licensed 800 MHz/900 MHz band and the unlicensed 902-928 MHz ISM band. These antennas are available in 6 dBi and 8 dBi gain configurations. They deliver all-weather performance with a rugged industrial-grade design and heavy-duty, powder-coated, steel mounting brackets. Additional features include a lightweight fiberglass radome and an integral N-Female connector. These antennas are ideal for multipoint, Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) and mobile applications.This new line of antennas offers an impressively wider range of supported bandwidths that stretches from 824 MHz to 960 MHz. They also have a rugged design with a long service life, backed by KP’s reputation for high-quality, high-performance antennas.These new 900 MHz Omni antennas from KP Performance Antennas are in stock. Click here to know more about KP’s 900 MHz Omni Antennas.last_img read more

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Carlos Carrasco’s dominance gets Indians 5-0 win; Three Takeaways

first_img Ashley is a former basketball player who covers the Cleveland Cavaliers, Indians and high school sports for NEO Sports Insiders. She also covers the Cavs for SB Nation’s Fear The Sword. Ashley is a 2015 graduate of John Carroll University and previously worked in political journalism. You can follow her on Twitter @AshleyBastock42 Ashley Bastock The Indians finally got their bats to catch up to their pitching on Friday night, as the Tribe topped the Tampa Bay Rays 5-0.In a role reversal from Thursday night, the Tribe recorded seven hits, compared to just three for Tampa Bay.Carlos Carrassco (3.83 ERA) got his 11th win of the year (and his eighth win on the road) in another Tribe shutout performance.With two games left in the series, here are our three takeaways from the Friday win. Pages: 1 2 3 4 Related TopicsAustin JacksonBradley ZimmerCarlos CarascoClevelandCleveland IndiansEdwin EncarnacionGiovanny UrshelaJay BruceJose RamirezMLBTampa Bay Rayslast_img read more

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Taniguchi takes two-stroke lead

first_img IN FIVE EASY PIECES WITH TAKE 5 GET THE BEST OF THE JAPAN TIMES GOTEMBA, Shizuoka Pref. – Joint overnight leader Toru Taniguchi embarked on a late birdie blitz to grab sole possession of the lead after a 6-under-par 66 in the second round of the Mitsui Sumitomo Visa Taiheiyo Masters on Friday. Teeing off in a five-way tie for the lead, Taniguchi picked up his first shot of the day on the third hole at Taiheiyo Club and added another birdie on the sixth in a bogey-free journey over the Gotemba Course. She is two strokes clear of Australia’s Brendan Jones on 11-under 133. last_img read more

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One New Death And 14 New Cases Of COVID-19

first_imgThe person who died is a 71-year-old Anchorage resident who acquired the infection outside of Alaska, tested positive on March 28 and had been hospitalized in state. The patient had preexisting health conditions. Also of note Sunday is that one of the Anchorage cases is a staff member at the McLaughlin Youth Center (MYC) within the DHSS Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). Since learning of the positive test result, DJJ Director Tracy Dompeling has been in close contact with the Alaska Section of Epidemiology and the Anchorage Health Department to facilitate contact investigations. DJJ is implementing all recommended and necessary protective measures for both staff and residents. “We express our condolences to the family and loved ones of the Anchorage resident who died and is included in our case count Sunday. Our thoughts are with them,” said DHSS Commissioner Adam Crum. “Regarding the situation at McLaughlin, please know DJJ is working closely with state and local public health officials to ensure that MYC residents, staff and anyone who may have been in contact with this positive case is aware of this situation and knows what we plan to do.” These new cases and the new death were reported from 12:00 a.m. until 11:59 p.m. on April 4 and reflect data posted at noon Sunday on coronavirus.alaska.gov. This new reporting schedule for Alaska’s COVID-19 cases began on Thursday with the rollout of a new data dashboard. Of the new cases from Saturday that are reported Sunday, five are male and nine are female. Two cases are aged 10-19, three are aged 30-39, one is aged 40-49, three are aged 50-59, three are aged 60-69 and two are aged 70-79. A total of 20 people cumulatively have ever been hospitalized in Alaska; four new hospitalizations have been added in the past 24-hour reporting period.center_img FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) Sunday announced one new death and 14 new cases of COVID-19 in four Alaska communities – Anchorage (4), Fairbanks (7), Juneau (2) and Seward (1). This brings the total case count in Alaska to 185. DHSS remains committed to protecting the health and safety of staff and residents at all DJJ facilities. Since March 27, before this positive case occurred, DJJ had already suspended in-person visitation for family members and religious volunteers, providing visitation and services through electronic means. Other measures already in place at the facility include frequent handwashing, routine disinfection of high-touch surfaces and encouraging staff members who are sick to stay home. Because all of the DJJ facilities around Alaska are 24-hour facilities, operations cannot cease and all employees cannot be sent home to telecommute. Additional measures being taken to safely staff the facility at this time include:Bringing in state and local public health officials to assist with testing and contact investigations.Prioritized testing for staff and clients.Sending home staff members from the affected unit who likely had contact with the individual who tested positive.last_img read more

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Thompson Herah, Atkinson worried about return of sports

first_imgOlympians Elaine Thompson Herah and Alia Atkinson are concerned about competing in a post COVID-19 environment. Both athletes were speaking on Thursday during a panel discussion on Zoom hosted by the Olympians Association of Jamaica. The topic was how athletes can maintain their fitness and training during the coronavirus pandemic. There has been a global shutdown of sports since March, but various leagues have begun to announce plans for a return to competition, with strict health protocols in place. Athletics has been affected by the pandemic with the delay of the World Athletics Diamond League season and the postponement of the year’s marquee sporting event, the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, to July 2021. As countries are making plans to reopen their borders, Thompson Herah, the double Olympic sprint champion, says travel is a major challenge. “I’m excited to be back on the track, but the main fear is just travelling, overall,” she said. World Athletics recently released a provisional schedule for a revised Diamond League, which would begin in Monaco in mid-August and end in October. Jamaica’s Government reopened its borders on Monday for returning residents stuck overseas because of the pandemic while international visitors will be allowed into the country as of June 15. MENTAL BARRIERS FINA world champion swimmer Atkinson, who already qualified last August for the Olympics, is concerned about possible mental barriers that athletes will have to overcome to return to the pool. She said that the return to competition, initially, would be difficult, and that there are no plans for events this year, but that she expects a return for athletes to earn from competition. “There is nothing so far this year,” she said. “Next year? It’s going to be hard in the beginning, for sure, regardless. But if other people are competing, and that’s where you make your funds, I feel that people are going to show up.” daniel.wheeler@gleanerjm.comlast_img read more

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