Category: ptvtuopf

John Lithgow Returns to Broadway in Stories by Heart

first_img John Lithgow: Stories By Heart Related Shows John Lithgow(Photo: Polk & Co.) Two-time Tony winner John Lithgow returns to the Broadway stage on December 21 in his solo play John Lithgow: Stories by Heart. Directed by Daniel Sullivan, the show officially opens on January 11, 2018 for a limited run through March 4.John Lithgow: Stories by Heart evokes memories from Lithgow’s family, exploring and expanding on the limits of the actor’s craft, and conjuring a cast of characters from classic short stories by Ring Lardner and P.G. Wodehouse.Lithgow’s Broadway résumé spans more than four decades. He earned a 1973 Tony Award for his Broadway debut in The Changing Room and another for his turn in the 2002 musical Sweet Smell of Success. Lithgow’s other Broadway performances have included Tony-nominated roles in Requiem for a Heavyweight, M. Butterfly, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and The Columnist. Lithgow is a five-time Emmy winner for his work on Amazing Stories, 3rd Rock from the Sun and Dexter and a two-time Oscar nominee for The World According to Garp and Terms of Endearment.The design team for John Lithgow: Stories by Heart includes John Lee Beatty (scenic design) and Kenneth Posner (lighting design). John Lithgow: Stories by Heart first appeared in a 2008 off-Broadway incarnation directed by Jack O’Brien.center_img View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on March 4, 2018last_img read more

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Sparked by social studies lesson at SM South, Chase Horner helps raise $4,500 for drought stricken school in South Africa

first_imgLogan Carnes (from left), Chase Horner, Jay Selzer and Harley Witbrod, the four who worked together to organize the fundraising event.Rising SM South sophomore Chase Horner was in social studies class this past winter when teacher Joseph Laurenzo began discussing the water crisis being faced by the people of Cape Town, South Africa.For three years, drought has sapped the city’s water reserves, with shortages so severe today that reservoirs are expected to by exhausted sometime early next year.In the Cape Town area, residents have turned to natural springs and wells as a source for drinking water amid the drought. Photo credit Shutterstock.“It’s not something you expect to be able to happen in a place like that,” Horner said. “Cape Town’s a modern city with skyscrapers. And they’re still able to run out of water.”The lesson troubled Horner. He started talking with Logan Carnes, a friend from his church, Hillcrest Covenant in Overland Park, about the idea of trying to do something to help. Horner reached out to the American consulate in Cape Town, which connected him a school in the area that was looking to fix a broken well and drill a new one in an effort to reduce its reliance on the city’s water system. They would need $4,500 to fund the projects.So Horner and Carnes set to work. Dubbing their effort “Project Well,” they began soliciting donations from church members. They also started organizing a BBQ dinner fundraiser, soliciting donations for a silent auction from local businesses. They printed — and sold — 75 t-shirts.With the proceeds from the event on Friday, the group topped their $4,500 mark, and will be sending the funds to the school for their wells.“I was super surprised and pretty proud that we were able to do it so quickly,” Horner said. “Now we [Horner and Carnes] are kind of debating if we want to keep it going or look at another project.”last_img read more

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FAMU faces accreditation challenges head-on

first_img FAMU faces accreditation challenges head-on Associate Editor A report issued this spring by the ABA says Florida A&M University College of Law has a “steep mountain” to climb in order to receive full accreditation next summer. That may be true, but the school has started scaling it. FAMU law school opened its Orlando campus in 2002 and received provisional ABA accreditation in 2004. Original legislation to re-establish the law school stipulated that it receive full accreditation within five years after graduating its first class, or Summer 2009. The second of three scheduled ABA accreditation committee site visits took place in October 2007; a report detailing the committee’s findings was issued in March.The report pointed up “13 areas of concern” that must be addressed by the time of the next site visit in February 2009 if FAMU Law hopes to make that five-year deadline. Chief among them are bar exam passage rates that are below state and national averages, “continuing concern. . . about whether certain members of the faculty fully appreciate and embrace the need for scholarship,” and a pervasive distrust among faculty members to the point where they could barely put aside their differences long enough to successfully complete the ABA’s self-study process. As a result, the committee was critical not only of the FAMU Law self-study process but also of its findings.“The self-study is the embodiment of all the conflicting strengths and weaknesses of the law school,” the report says. Yet junior faculty members who tried to get senior, tenured faculty members to participate “were ignored, reflective of the dysfunction and dissention that were palpable during the site visit. . . repeated and painful efforts with limited success to get full faculty participation and buy-in during the self-study process reflects, at best, a faculty overburdened and unable to function together even when the goal is considered a unifying priority or, at worst, a callous disregard for the future of the law school.”That was then, said Dean LeRoy Pernell, who says that the report was based largely on data collected during the 2006-07 school year and culminated in the October ’07 site visit. At that point, FAMU Law had been without a dean for two years, faculty morale was at an all-time low, a few students had initiated lawsuits alleging that the school didn’t follow its own published procedures, and bar passage rates had fallen to 52 percent — the lowest in the state.Pernell officially took office in January on a two-year, $250,000 annual contract, but he says he didn’t have to wait to read the ABA report to know what FAMU Law’s key issues were. First on his list was attracting more quality talent to FAMU Law. By mid-May, he’d brought 14 new faculty and administrators on board, most of whom will be in place by the time the new school year starts in August.“The school was slow in hiring before,” Pernell says. “We’re not now.”Chief among the new hires is Kenneth Nunn, tenured University of Florida Law School faculty member and associate dean, who’ll start in a new position as dean of research and scholarship in July. He’s been meeting with Pernell recently “for us to roll up our sleeves” in advance of his official start date. New associate deans for students and international education help to round out a “whole new administrative team.”Robert Abrams, FAMU Law faculty member for the past four years and a law professor for 33, says Pernell’s ability to attract quality faculty and administrators was his first indication, as well as one of the most important, that things might be turning around for the troubled school.“These people are experienced. They’re at the top of their field, and they will be in leadership roles, taking responsibility immediately,” Abrams says. “That alone changes the dynamic. It gives everybody a fresh start.”Pernell took on the morale problem among existing faculty head-on as soon as he started in January, meeting individually with each faculty member and opening up the lines of communication.“I’ve been trying to make very clear how decisions are made, who’s making them and why they need to be made, and then apply them fairly across the board,” Pernell says. “There had been this sense of decisions made based on personal relationships, which created a real sense of the unknown. That really raised the suspicion level and the tendency not to communicate with each other.“Faculty tells me that there’s already a remarkable difference,” he says. “They can progress through a meeting now. They can talk to each other.” Abrams agrees.“Faculty meetings haven’t been nearly as rancorous,” Abrams says. “That’s not to say we haven’t disagreed, but there’s a new civility. There’s a little more focus on ‘what does the law school need?’ as opposed to extraneous matters. You have a feeling that all the parts are starting to pull in the same direction. It’s very pleasant.”Pernell, Abrams, and the ABA report itself all credited new FAMU President James Ammons with positive changes on FAMU’s main campus in Tallahassee — itself a source of disorganization and strife during the few years leading up to Ammons’ arrival — that have helped smooth the way for a better administration of FAMU Law. Also, Pernell says, overall applications are up, tutoring for the bar exam is burgeoning, and recruitment efforts — previously almost nil — have been significantly beefed up.“The biggest challenge for us right now is the ABA timeline. We know what the problem areas are. It’s getting these things done in time for the next site visit that’s the challenge,” Pernell says. “We’re getting real close. The pieces for our success are being put into place.”Nancy Slonim, media relations officer for the ABA, said the accreditation process is confidential, but Pernell says the next step is a February 2009 site visit followed by a June 2009 ABA meeting at which FAMU Law’s fate should be decided. He noted that all students attending FAMU Law now and during the Fall 2008-09 school year will be covered and eligible to take the bar exam under FAMU’s provisional ABA accreditation. June 1, 2008 Kim MacQueen Associate Editor Regular News FAMU faces accreditation challenges head-onlast_img read more

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First local Zika case detected outside of South Florida

first_imgFlorida’s governor today announced five more locally acquired Zika cases, one of them in Pinellas County, the state’s first non-travel–related case reported outside of South Florida.In other developments, a Brazil-led team published a new report outlining the spectrum of severe brain changes seen before and after birth in affected babies, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) added the Bahamas to its Zika travel advisory.Florida’s local cases rise to 42Pinellas County, on Florida’s Gulf coast, is 280 miles northwest of Miami-Dade and includes the St. Petersburg and Clearwater metropolitan areas. Health officials are still investigating the case and haven’t named it as an active Zika transmission area.However, Gov. Rick Scott said in a statement today that door-to-door outreach and sampling is under way in Pinellas County and that aggressive mosquito control activities are taking place.The other four local cases announced today are all from the Wynwood active transmission area, just north of downtown Miami. Today’s developments lift Florida’s local Zika case total to 42.Regarding Wynwood, Scott said further testing has cleared the entire perimeter of the neighborhood, shrinking that active transmission area to a one-half-square-mile area.Both of Florida’s current active transmission areas are in Miami-Dade County. On Aug 19, officials confirmed a second area—a 1.5-square-mile section of Miami Beach. Health officials, however, are investigating several individual cases in the area that are outside those two neighborhoods.Zika birth-defect imaging, CDC Bahamas advisoryIn other Zika news, Brazilian researchers, with collaborators in other countries, today profiled a host of severe radiographic prenatal and postnatal findings in Zika-affected babies, including some features and patterns that aren’t typical for microcephaly linked to other viral diseases. They published their findings in Radiology. Their analysis included computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound. Microcephaly was just one of the brain changes they observed. The team documented cortical malformations and changes at the white-gray matter junction, reduction in brain volume, and larger-than-normal fluid-filled spaces in ventriculomegaly.The CDC today added the Bahamas to its level 2 travel notice for Zika virus. It said local Zika virus transmission has been reported on the island of New Providence, which includes the city of Nassau. In its travel advisories for Zika, the CDC urges pregnant women to avoid affected areas and for their sexual partners and those thinking of becoming pregnant to take certain precautions.See also:Aug 23 Gov Rick Scott statementlast_img read more

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Better fish catches touted among benefits of novel CARIFICO project

first_img Mar 23, 2020 “They have seen significant social and economic benefits from working together and operating around the FADs. The fishers have been involved in the construction and deployment of the fishing gear, as well as developing rules to regulate activities around the FADs and collecting and fisheries data. This is a tangible example of what fishers can achieve by collaborating with each other and with the government,” Haughton said.  The Project Manager of the pilot project in Grenada, Mr. Toby Francis Calliste, said that they have learned a lot from the CARIFICO project. He noted that the fishing communities of Grenada have realised tremendous benefits through the co-management arrangement. The CARIFICO project has transformed the fishing industry in Grenville and by extension in Grenada, said Calliste, who presented on the impacts of the project in Grenada. Dominican representatives said that fishers in that country embraced the important benefits of the FAD programme. They added that the Roseau Complex fishers now exercised greater compliance with FAD management practices. They hoped that with the sustained deployment of public FADs, user conflict will be reduced. The CARIFICO-CRFM Joint Statement on Fisheries Co-Management, which is to be tabled at the April 2018 meeting of Fisheries Ministers from CRFM Member States, envisions the way forward. It addresses four areas: Support for Implementation of Co-management; Training in Support of Co-management; Co-management to Address Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management; and Public Education and Awareness. The statement is intended to solidify the support of CRFM Member States for the implementation of the recommendations of the CARIFICO Project and the advancement of co-management, as well as improved fisheries governance in the Caribbean. This should include legal and institutional reforms, training and capacity development, public education and awareness building, and empowerment of fishers’ organizations and fishing communities. (CRFM Press Release) Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Member States to Boost Food Production To Lessen COVID-19… BELIZE CITY, BELIZE, Monday, 11 December 2017 (CRFM)—The Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) and its partners at the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) recently held a wrap-up meeting in Saint Lucia at which the outcomes of the novel Caribbean Fisheries Co-Management Project (CARIFICO) were unveiled. The most important benefits underscored are better catches and improved incomes for fishers who began using Fish Aggregating Devices or FADs. These were designed, constructed, deployed and managed in a cooperative manner by the fishers themselves in collaboration with government officials and with support from the Japanese experts. Fishers from the pilot countries attended the meeting in Saint Lucia and shared how the project has positively impacted them. Fisheries officials from the CARICOM countries, except for Bahamas and Belize, also attended. International partners from JICA, fisheries experts deployed in the region and officials from JICA headquarters in Japan, as well as representatives from the Embassy of Japan in Trinidad and Tobago, the Caribbean Network of Fisherfolk Organisation, the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), and the University of Florida were also present. CRFM Executive Director Milton Haughton said that he was impressed with the progress made in introducing co-management approaches in specific fisheries, as well as the level of investment of fishers in the process. Fishers have formed new fisherfolk organisations which are actively participating in the development and management of the target fisheries as a result of the CARIFICO project. Through the project, governments in the six pilot countries are sharing more authority and responsibility for fisheries development and management with stakeholders by improving relations and communications, and promoting increased participation by them in decision-making in fisheries. Participants at the forum Apr 3, 2020 You may be interested in… IICA establishes Advisory Council for Food Security in the… CARICOM Agri Ministers Meet To Craft COVID-19 Food Security… Mar 18, 2020 Aug 19, 2020 CARDI Working With Stakeholders to Bolster Agriculture… CRFM, Japan experts discuss impact of fisheries co-management projectThree representatives of the Japan-funded Caribbean Fisheries Co-management Project (CARIFICO) discussed the progress of the multi-million-dollar project with representatives of the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) on an official visit to Belize on Monday, March 14 and Tuesday, March 15.  Mr. Milton Haughton, CRFM Executive Director, met with Mr. Masaru…March 16, 2016In “Antigua & Barbuda”CRFM, JICA concluding innovative Caribbean Fisheries Co-management projectBELIZE CITY, BELIZE, Wednesday, 29 November 2017 (CRFM)—An innovative fisheries project, which the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) has been coordinating since 2013 with the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) across six OECS Member States, is nearing its end. The Caribbean Fisheries Co-Management Project (CARIFICO) was developed in 2012. Between…November 30, 2017In “Antigua & Barbuda”CRFM hosts training in fishery sector sanitary controls in St. Vincent and the GrenadinesBELIZE CITY, BELIZE, Friday, 16 December 2016 (CRFM)— Thirty inspector and laboratory analysts from 15 CARIFORUM countries participated in a two-week training covering ‘Food safety in the fishery sector’ and ‘Fishery products laboratory testing’. The training, delivered by four international experts, was held 28 November to 9 December 2016. The…December 16, 2016In “Antigua & Barbuda”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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Airgas’ quick reaction softens the blow

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Pricing increases for North America customers

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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An industry turned upside down

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

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Think before you rethink

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

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Combi Lift Bremen-bound; Combi Dock set up

first_imgThe company’s owners J. Poulsen Shipping (JPS) and Harren & Partner (H&P) say that having established Combi Lift within the arena for the ocean transportation of heavy lift and project cargoes, a new strategy is required “in order to be stronger and adapt to the market.” The owners state that this development will strengthen Combi Lift’s ability to respond to the precise needs and requirements of its clients. Harren & Partner’s logistics and engineering experts with their specialised equipment will also form part of the new team, enabling Combi Lift to become a real one-stop-shop for site-to-site transportation of large and heavy components. Concurrently, H&P and JPS will jointly establish Combi Dock Chartering in Korsoer, Denmark. This company will be the specialised set-up for chartering and operation of the semi-submersible COMBI DOCK (I + III) vessels, as well as for the Patria and Parida. The highly specialised commercial and operational management of these ships will continue to be undertaken from Korsoer, as well as branch offices in Houston and Singapore. H&P and JPS are both maintaining their respective shareholdings in the jointly developed fleet of heavy lift and semi-submersible vessels.  www.combidock.comwww.combi-lift.netlast_img read more

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