Category: yucgivfi

Inside Arts Features Gallery Owner Karen Wray

first_imgKaren Wray Gallery, owner Karen Wray, will be featured 8:30 p.m. Sunday, 4 p.m. Tuesday and 8 p.m. Thursday on Inside Arts. Courtesy photoCOMMUNITY News:The Los Alamos Museum of Art continues its series, Inside Arts, with an interview of local gallery owner Karen Wray. The interview airs 8:30 p.m. Sunday, 4 p.m. Tuesday and 8 p.m. Thursday.Artist, teacher, promoter and gallery owner – Wray wears all these hats. She opened her first gallery in Los Alamos in 2008 realizing the town needed, “someplace where our most experienced artists can show their art”.Four locations later, she settled her gallery, the Karen Wray Gallery, at 1247 Central Ave., which seems to be a great fit.Wray describes herself as an artist who is “absolutely joyous” when immersed in the process of painting. Her landscapes are filled with dramatic light and shadow patterns, which capture people’s attention and her detail work keeps them looking. Her current focus is a series of cloud paintings.As a teacher, Wray said she works to instill a love of painting in her students.“Painting is very personal,” she said. “You are putting yourself out there in the public … we need to be kind with each other.”She said one of her axioms is, “if you don’t make mistakes you’re not learning anything.”As a promoter, Wray said, “The main driving interest in this town is science and we need to make art a little bit important … art is as important as family photos, if you look at civilization, history is usually in the arts and artifacts and we must make the younger generation understand that.”Wray and her staff are always welcoming.“You don’t need to buy anything, just come in for a visit and to see the art and make it a habit,” Wray said.The gallery is open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.Inside Arts airs weekly on PAC 8, 8:30 p.m. Sundays, 4 p.m. Tuesdays and 8 p.m. Thursdays. For more information, contact Jean Gindreau at PAC 8 at 662.7228 or pac8@losalamos.com or Ruth Tatter at LAMOA at 662.5496 or at rjtatter@gmail.com.last_img read more

Read More

Brazil adopts first fuel cell bus

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

Read More

The politics of class struggle

first_imgThere’s real irony in Alan Milburn’s report on Fair Access to the Professions. It reintroduces to the diversity debate a subject that is supposed to have been consigned to the dustbin of history (as Trotsky would certainly not have put it) by ‘third-way’ proselytisers like Milburn himself – class. Blairism instructs that identity (and in particular race, gender and sexuality) is what truly defines people in this solipsistic, post-ideological age. Socio-economic status, like collectivism, is so 1970s, like British Leyland and The Rubettes. ‘We’re all middle-class now.’ As a political philosophy it delivered three election victories in the boom years. Just about everyone could keep up with the Joneses by maxing out their credit card or leveraging their houses to fulfil aspirations stoked by rampant materialism. Britain remained a low-wage, low-skills economy, but it didn’t matter. Now the party’s over. As we sober up, it’s clear that Britain is as hamstrung by class as ever. And in certain respects – including in respect of access to, and advancement within, the legal profession – seemingly more so. Depressingly, after 12 years of (nominally) Labour government, equality of opportunity remains as distant an aspiration as ever. So, What Is To Be Done? (As Lenin certainly would have put it, and indeed did). Well for a start, the government should look closer to home. The legal profession did not abolish maintenance grants for students and introduce fat tuition fees, disincentivising poorer people from seeking higher education, especially at the top universities. Nor did it entrench in society a culture of greed and soaring inequality that established private gain and private sector provision as virtues in their own right, implicitly scorning the notion of state provision – including state school provision. Milburn deserves credit for disinterring the class debate nevertheless. And the report’s authors are right: the profession does need to look again at diversity and consider the issue more broadly. Signatories to the Law Society’s Diversity Charter pledge to publish annually the diversity profile of UK employees and details of their work on equality, diversity and inclusion. They need to remember that social class needs to part of their rubric, along with gender, race, disability and sexuality. Otherwise the elephant in the room will continue to be ignored.last_img read more

Read More

How Part L will change your life

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

Read More

My digital life … Paul Cowling

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGINlast_img read more

Read More

It’s all in the brief

first_imgWhether you are a domestic customer upgrading a bathroom or a public authority building a new hospital, setting out precisely what you need and expect from your investment is a pretty fundamental first step. It is not rocket science to suggest that failure to embrace this step can generally lead only to overspend, late completion and disappointment.On this basis the National Audit Office’s (NAO) latest damning report into the performance of PFI projects across the UK public infrastructure realm is certainly worth a read. The headlines from this comprehensive piece of work are clear. With 716 PFI and PF2 projects – a total capital value of £59.4bn – either under construction or in operation, the UK central and local government faces the prospect of paying for these assets and services until the 2040s, to the tune of £199bn.The report raises some important points around the cost of finance and the impact on cash-strapped public clients of the inflexibility built into many of the deals signed over the last few years. There are indeed many examples of bad deals being done at the taxpayer’s expense.Listening to numerous tales of disappointment on all sides of recent PFI deals struck across transport, health, education and justice, it is clear that many of its problems have stemmed from a basic failure to get the brief rightBut equally the report highlights the critical need for clients, whether embarking on a project procured under a PFI deal or a more traditionally financed arrangement, to absolutely nail the brief from the start. That means deciding precisely what outcomes are needed from the investment – as distinct from those wanted – and exactly what risks, roles and responsibilities will be transferred as part of the contract.Reading the NAO report and listening to numerous tales of disappointment on all sides of recent PFI deals struck across transport, health, education and justice, it is clear that many of the problems have stemmed from this basic failure to get the brief right. Reviewing the drivers behind the use of PFI reveals some sensible thinking to engage the private sector and tackle some of the biggest problems seen across the life cycle of assets. As the NAO points outs, this aspiration comes down to leveraging the private sector to create: Certainty over construction costs – the private sector is incentivised to build assets to budget as it bears the risk of construction cost overruns.Improved operational efficiency – the special purpose vehicle has an incentive to consider how it can reduce long-term running costs at the outset, as it bears the cost of operating it.Higher-quality and well-maintained assets – the PFI deal requires assets to be well maintained during the contract period and handed back in an as-built condition, meaning that users benefit and assets have potentially longer lives.  Whatever form of contract is chosen, the key to success is for clients to set at the outset a brief focused on outcomesThese objectives underpin the ultimate aim of creating and maintaining an asset – be it a road, school, hospital or prison – that adds value to the public it serves and enables the services provided to be better, more effective and more efficient.My concern, reading the NAO report and the subsequent media commentary on its findings, is that we once again find ourselves down in the weeds arguing about capital cost and operation spending. Don’t misunderstand me: in this era of constrained public finances, these are important measures. The NAO makes a valid point when it says “current pressures on public sector budgets are resulting in significant reductions in maintenance spending on non-PFI assets in some sectors”.It highlights the pressure on health trusts – one of the biggest users of PFI, which between 2014/15 and 2015/16 reported an increase in the critical infrastructure maintenance backlog of more than 50% to £2.3bn. However, the solution to this backlog was simply for the Treasury to let the NHS move more than £1bn earmarked for capital investment to its operational budget to pay for day-to-day spending. Yet, as work by the Digital Built Britain programme last year showed, the greatest return on the public sector’s infrastructure investments will always come from increased service delivery. The reality is that a 10% saving in the UK’s £89bn annual capital spend on public infrastructure or its £122bn operational investment is dwarfed by even a 5% improvement in the £597bn contribution to GDP the services these assets provide. Improved outcomes must therefore be the foremost focus for investment.Investment remains critical to the UK’s post Brexit economic plans. The most recent National Infrastructure and Construction Pipeline contains some £600bn of planned and proposed work over the next decade. The NAO report itself points out that delivering infrastructure using private finance is critical to the government’s infrastructure pipeline. Alongside the PF2 model, it expects to continue to use other forms of public-private partnership (PPP), which, as the NAO highlights, have successfully delivered local government waste deals, off‑shore wind transmission infrastructure, university accommodation, and the Department for Transport’s purchase of rolling stock.Without question there are many ways we must learn from our track record of PFI and PPP investment deals to ensure this future, vital engagement with the private sector is improved to deliver greater overall returns to customers in the long term.Whatever form of contract is chosen, the key to success is for clients to set at the outset a brief focused on outcomes: to identify their needs, understand what it will cost and ensure the asset investment made actually generates measurable improvements in public service.last_img read more

Read More

Hellmann appoints Freese

first_imgFreese, who will be based in Hamburg, will manage the business development and growth of the company’s air and ocean freight services, as well as the development of the sales and solutions business, taking over some of the current duties of Hellmann’s managing partner, Jost Hellmann.  www.hellmann.netlast_img

Read More

Solicitor leaves profession after lying on his CV

first_imgA City solicitor who made a string of fabrications on his CV has agreed to leave the profession.Michael McCooe, who now lives in Switzerland, drafted a CV in February 2011 which he handed to international firm McCarthy Tetrault and an employment agency. He secured employment at the firm four months later.McCooe had stated he had been admitted to professional bodies in Australia, Ireland, France and Switzerland in the 1980s and 1990s, and also claimed he had qualifications from King’s College, London, the University of Zurich and Trinity College, Dublin.But it transpired McCooe had not been admitted before any professional bodies in Ireland, France or Switzerland and had only practised there.He held no qualifications from Trinity College or the University of Zurich, and held a postgraduate diploma in EC Law from King’s College, not an LLM in competition law as he had stated.In a notice published on the Solicitors Regulation Authority website today, McCooe said he does not now remember how the inaccuracies arose on his CV, but he accepts he is responsible for them.He admitted he was aware of, and failed to correct, false and inaccurate details that would be misleading, and on that basis he was dishonest.‘His recollection is that his employer did not rely on the CV when offering him a job, and he did not realise that his employer would include incorrect details in its publications.’Once McCooe realised that his employer had published these incorrect details he raised the issue and made sure that the details were removed. He also made sure that the employment agency corrected the details before he used their services again.McCooe, who was admitted as a solicitor in December 1991, undertook to remove himself from the roll of solicitors within the next 28 days – with the effect of a striking-off order. He undertook not to apply for restoration to the roll in the future.He also agreed to pay the SRA’s costs of £1,872.last_img read more

Read More

Asset manager invests in Akiem loco leasing business

first_imgEUROPE: SNCF Logistics subsidiary ERMEWA has announced an agreement for Deutsche Asset Management to take a 50% equity stake in its Akiem locomotive leasing business with effect from March.ERMEWA said it was aiming to consolidate Akiem’s position in the ‘rapidly expanding’ freight locomotive leasing market. The greater resources at its disposal following the deal would enable it to nearly double the size of its fleet of more than 300 locomotives over the next 10 years. ‘This strategic action will allow us to sustain Akiem’s growth in France and Europe with a partner who shares our long-term vision for the future and for the company’s operational development’, said ERMEWA Group President David Zindo.last_img read more

Read More

DCSL reports ‘significant growth’ for 2016

first_img Share BusinessLocalNews DCSL reports ‘significant growth’ for 2016 by: Dominica Vibes News – April 22, 2017 Sharing is caring! Tweet Sharecenter_img 213 Views   one comment Share The Dominica Cooperative Societies League (DCSL) has reported significant growth in its assets, loan portfolio, membership and membership savings in 2016.The League reported on its portfolio at its 60th annual general meeting held at the Garraway Hotel on Saturday 22 April 2017, which was attended by credit union representatives from across the island.The AGM was held under the theme ‘Resilience: developing a pathway to sustainable growth and development through cooperation’ with senior investigator at the Financial Intelligence Unit, Patrick George as the featured speaker.“The credit union movement continues to grow in the economy of Dominica and during the year under review, we have recorded some significant growth,” outgoing President of the Dominica Credit Union League, Murphy Wallace said.“For example, we have moved from a capital base of $665, 170 million in 2015 to $730, 121 million in 2016, so that’s a significant growth on terms of the movement as a whole,” Murphy reported.According to the report of the board of directors, the consolidated unaudited financial statements confirm the improvements in the DCSL’s financial performance.“For example, the total assets increased by 65.24 million dollars to $730, 411 million; that is a significant growth in assets, representing a 9.81% increase over that of 2015. So we continue to grow and we continue to do very well,” Murphy informed. Murphy said in the League’s loan portfolio, “significant growth” was also recorded as “we have moved from $462.38 million in 2015 to $488.53 million in 2016”.Among the League’s other achievements for the 2016reporting year, was an increase in its members and their savings.“In the members’ savings and deposits, we have realized a 3.37% growth and that represents $13.57 million. In a challenging economic time, if our members could save that kind of money, it is something that is very significant,” Murphy stated.Additionally, i the members’ share capital, the League recorded “some increase by 8.91% or 0.635 million dollars”.Moreover, the League’s liabilities increased by 653, 259 million in 2016 and this was attributed to the term deposits which witnessed a significant boost of 219, 973 million.“In terms of dollars and cents, what it really represents is 7.765 million dollars. So we have recorded some significant growth and that of itself shows the confidence of the members in their movement in terms of doing business and investing their monies with their credit unions,” Murphy explained.In terms of membership, this grew from 67, 787 in 2015 to 75, 310 in 2016 – an increase of 7, 523 members, representing 11.1%.“We also note that some of the increase we have sort of a dual membership in some of the credit unions, but that is not a significant amount,” Murphy stated.last_img read more

Read More