Category: fhvinugi

New York Financier Steven Rattner Named Lead Adviser for Auto Industry Bailout

first_imgNew York financier Steven Rattner has been tapped to lead the U.S. Treasury Dept.’s auto industry bailout team, according to a report from the Wall Street Journal (WSJ).AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Rattner, 56, has been named lead adviser for the committee that will oversee reorganization efforts at General Motors and Chrysler. He will advise Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner and Lawrence Summers, the director of the National Economic Council, on the automakers’ turnaround progress. According to the WSJ, Rattner is a major player in New York’s political and charity circles, but is lesser known in Washington and Detroit. A former New York Times financial reporter turned investment banker, in 2000 Rattner co-founded the Quadrangle Group, the media-focused private equity firm that he is now leaving to take the Treasury position.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

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Local Suicide Deaths Spike In 2020

first_imgBy CAROL A. CLARKLos Alamos Daily Postcaclark@ladailypost.comWith confirmation from the Office of the Medical Investigator pending on a couple of cases, suicide deaths have tripled in the last six months over annual numbers in the last decade.“We have averaged two suicides per year for the last 10 years but this year we’ve responded to six suicide deaths between January and the beginning of June,” Los Alamos Police Cmdr. Oliver Morris said in an interview with the Los Alamos Daily Post. “Five of the six were male … the female died of self asphyxiation and each of the males died of self-inflicted gunshot wounds.”Nationally more than 50 percent of males commit suicide by firearm and 34 percent of females by poisoning, Cmdr. Morris said, adding that about half of suicide victims leave a note. The majority commit suicide in their own home – those who go elsewhere often do so because they have family members at home.“Of the six suicides or suspected suicide this year in Los Alamos, the average age was 59,” Cmdr. Morris said. “The youngest was 32 years old and the oldest was 84.”Cmdr. Morris said he was not sure what has triggered the recent spike in local suicide deaths because several occurred prior to the COVID-19 stay at home order.“We as police officers are taught to recognize signs of someone thinking about suicide such as when they talk about it, or start giving away their possessions, cars and other things they won’t be needing anymore,” he said. “Isolation is definitely a factor in suicide … we encourage people to get outside, take walks, talk to family and friends over the phone and Zoom.Family and friends are the gatekeepers for their loved ones. If they notice red flags, Cmdr. Morris encourages them to try to talk the suicidal person into giving up their firearms for safe keeping.“The police department can keep firearms for someone going through a rough time,” he said. “In some cases, we will get a court order, but we prefer that the person surrender their weapons. During this time when so many people are staying home there’s less chance for gatekeepers to notice symptoms … we encourage people feeling suicidal to seek help.”He encourages gatekeepers to question, persuade and refer (QPR) a suspected suicidal person. One of the resources Cmdr. Morris mentioned for people needing help or concerned loved ones is www.losalamosmentalhealth.org, which does screenings for depression, PTSD and other issues and also has a crisis line.Cmdr. Morris also mentioned the toll responding to suicides can take on responding officers.“We’re in a small town and we often know the people and it’s difficult, especially when it’s children,” he said. “But our officers are always professional and do their job. Afterward they may go through a debriefing with one of our police chaplains.”Los Alamos County Social Services Manager Donna Casados also was not sure what has caused the recent rise in local suicide deaths.“Overall, depression, substance abuse, lack of support and not knowing where to turn are big factors,” Casados said. “The biggest hurdle is accepting help and being able to reach out.”The County has partnered with “OpenBeds” and is now a provider, she said.OpenBeds  and the New Mexico Department of Human Services’ Behavioral Health Services Division recently partnered to launch the New Mexico Behavioral Health Referral Network.The New Mexico Behavioral Health Referral Network allows New Mexico’s treatment community to assess the needs of their patients, locate an appropriate facility, and digitally refer them for care rapidly and effectively.“The potential to coordinate care quickly and accurately when our neighbors need to transition from one level of care to another can improve the quality of treatment,” said Behavioral Health Services Division Director Neal A. Bowen, PhD in a news release. “It holds the promise of allowing providers, families, and patients to focus on the treatment needs of an episode of care rather than the logistical processes.”Also, the Human Services Department provides services and benefits to more than 1 million New Mexicans through several programs including: the Medicaid Program, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Child Support Program, and several Behavioral Health Services.“We hear that insurance is a big factor in why some people don’t seek help,” Casados said. “That should not keep anyone from seeking help because the state has assistance and the County has an Indigent Health Fund for residents in need.”Casados encourages anyone feeling suicidal to reach out.“It’s worse to ignore it … and everyone needs help every now and then,” she said.To learn more, visit www.losalamosmentalhealth.org.last_img read more

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LaSalle to raise £400m UK opportunity fund

first_imgPaul Richards, LaSalle’s head of global managed accounts said the LaSalle UK Ventures Fund II was expected to close in the first quarter of next year. It aims to provide its investors with a internal rate of return of 20%. Richards said: ‘In the last two to three months, we’ve seen properties on the market where you think it’s good value.’ The fund manager hopes to raise debt for the fund at a loan to value ratio of 75%. Property values have fallen by 24% since June 2007, according to Investment Property Databank figures. Richards said this should evoke forced sellers to provide assets that the fund could buy.last_img read more

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COVID-19 redesigning the Foreign Trade Policy Agenda

first_img You may be interested in… More deaths from COVID-19 recorded in CARICOM countries,… CARICOM Council for Trade and Economic Development (COTED) – meeting of senior officials scheduled for April 2-3 postponed.CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) – In my article of February 26 on Outcomes and Questions, I was doubtful that the CSME work programme emerging from the Intersessional Meeting of Heads in Barbados, February 18-19, could be completed. With COVID-19 and other issues, it is now clear that this work programme is not likely to be accomplished within the timeframe leading to the CARICOM Heads of Government Conference scheduled for July 2-3 in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. As the agenda is reset, COVID-19 may actually convince CARICOM Members of their need to press on with CSME implementation.ACP/EU Post Cotonou Negotiations – Like elsewhere, staff of the European Commission and the ACP Secretariat in Brussels are working from home and priorities are being reordered. Europe is a hotspot for COVID-19. Countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific are also battling this virus. Some work is continuing in the negotiations especially on the Caribbean protocol. I cannot, however, see the ACP Council meeting proceeding. It was scheduled for April/May possibly in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The conclusion of the negotiations could be further delayed.The CARIFORUM/EU Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) 5-year review – preparatory work is continuing but the EPA Council Meeting for the formal review is likely to be later in the year.ACP Transformation – based on decisions from the ACP Summit, December 2019, the ratification of the revised Georgetown Agreement could be extended.UK/Caribbean Forum, London – this overdue meeting was scheduled for April 7-8 and should have enabled the Caribbean and the United Kingdom (UK) to consider their post Brexit relationship. It was also postponed.World Trade Organization (WTO) 12th Ministerial Conference (MC12) – this Conference was scheduled for June 8-11 in Kazakhstan – the host government has informed the WTO Director General of their desire to postpone this meeting. The WTO General Council is to take a formal decision. WTO staff and representatives in Geneva are also working from home.The Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM), Rwanda – this meeting is scheduled for June 22-27. Although also registering COVID-19 cases, Rwanda had indicated on March 10 that the CHOGM would proceed as scheduled. If the COVID crisis continues, a decision will have to be taken on whether it will be feasible to convene this meeting.The CARICOM/Africa Summit is scheduled to be held around the time of CHOGM, so if that is rescheduled, it is likely that this meeting will be also.CARICOM/US Relations – regarding the extension of the US Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act (CBPTA), which expires in September, so far, there has been little progress in Congress, which is now mainly focused on COVID-19 and its economic fallout.UNCTAD XV, Barbados, October 18-23 – for now, I am assuming that this Conference is still on track along with the UN General Assembly scheduled for September. CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak Submitted by Elizabeth Morgan, Specialist in International Trade Policy and International Politics Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… CARICOM: Rising to the ChallengesBy Elizabeth Morgan Another CARICOM Day has passed. It was acknowledged to varying degrees across the region and at diplomatic missions overseas. The CARICOM Secretary General, Ambassador Irwin LaRoque, made a statement on Saturday, July 4, congratulating the Community on its 47th Anniversary and outlining its achievements. Yes, there are…July 8, 2020In “CARICOM”CARICOM Heads: Outcomes, QuestionsBy Elizabeth Morgan In my article last week I addressed some of the trade and economic issues on the agenda or which should have been discussed at the 31st Intersessional Meeting of the CARICOM Heads of Government in Barbados, February 18-19. With Jamaica’s Prime Minister absent, the Prime Ministerial Sub-Committee…February 26, 2020In “31Intersessional”CARICOM Heads: Addressing trade and economic issues (Commentary)By Elizabeth Morgan CARICOM Heads of Government will be concluding their intersessional meeting in Barbados today. This Meeting is chaired by Prime Minister Mia Mottley, who has responsibility for the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME) in the quasi-Cabinet. Articles leading up to this meeting, give the impression that Heads…February 19, 2020In “31Intersessional”Share this on WhatsApp By Elizabeth Morgan In my article on January 8, I outlined the Caribbean’s foreign trade policy agenda for 2020, but I certainly did not see COVID-19 on the horizon. With drastic global action to contain and mitigate the impact of this coronavirus, the foreign trade agenda now looks very different. Everything is in a tailspin as meetings are rescheduled or cancelled and timetables are thrown out. The focus has shifted to health and economic recovery. The foreign trade agenda now looks like this: On January 1st, we welcomed 2020 intending to follow a set foreign trade policy agenda. One has to recognize, though, that foreign policy is fraught with the unexpected and unpredictable. In under three (3) months, that 2020 agenda was completely altered by an extraordinary global health crisis (refer to my article on the Trade and Health Link of March 18).  It is now evident that the economic fallout could be tremendous possibly triggering a global economic recession. Some analysts are projecting that the impact of this health and economic crisis could be felt through the year and could result in major policy readjustments. The course is uncharted. Here in the Caribbean, we have to pray for a calm hurricane season, June to November, or this Leap Year could be claiming a special place in history.center_img Oct 15, 2020 Oct 15, 2020 St. Lucia records more cases of COVID Oct 16, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC last_img read more

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Air Liquide to showcase at Gastech

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

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Local government: surveillance powers, tenancy and effective consultation

first_img Secure tenancies and minorsThe problem with the unexpected is its sheer unexpectedness. The sun may be shining, the way ahead clear and then, out of the blue, it happens. That may have been the feeling of housing officers in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham when they purported to grant a tenancy to a minor, no doubt unaware of the legal complexities this would unleash. The ‘tenant’ in question (the appellant), when aged 16 and pregnant, had applied to the council for accommodation under the homelessness provisions of the Housing Act 1996. For, following regulations in 2002, homeless 16- or 17-year-old applicants now have a priority need for accommodation. The council thereupon entered into a tenancy agreement with the appellant in its standard form. Subsequently, when complaints were received about nuisance and rubbish in respect of her occupation of the premises, the council served a notice to quit upon her. However, she complained (among other things) that, since she could not hold a legal estate, the notice to quit was not effective. Her contentions were upheld by the Court of Appeal on 1 April in Alexander-David v Mayor and Burgesses of the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham [2009] EWCA Civ 259. The case will prompt local government lawyers to recall (with varying degrees of affection) the Elysian fields of equity and trusts. For section 1(6) of the Law of Property Act 1925 provides that a minor is incapable of holding a legal estate. And (per paragraph 1(1) of schedule 1 to the Trusts of Land and Appointment of Trustees Act 1996) any purported grant of a legal estate to a minor will not achieve this but will operate as a declaration that the premises are held in trust for the minor. In the circumstances, the Court of Appeal agreed that, for so long as the council held the premises in trust for the appellant, it could not lawfully destroy the subject matter of the trust by serving notice to quit upon the appellant. Sullivan LJ (who gave the leading judgment) said that the council, in the absence of any other trustee, was in the uncomfortable position of being both lessor and trustee. As lessor, the council was not merely a party to the breach of trust, but the instigator of the breach. Consequently, he concluded that service of notice to quit only on the appellant minor as beneficiary of the trust was not sufficient to terminate the tenancy that was being held by the council as trustee on her behalf. Nevertheless, although it is not the role of the courts to advise, Sullivan LJ did helpfully suggest that, in such cases, the proper grant of a genuine licence may assist, as might an agreement to grant a lease for the period until such an applicant turns 18. But, in any event, the court highlighted the importance of expressly recognising the inability of a minor to hold a legal estate and stating that such an estate is not being granted but the council is instead securing that accommodation is available by granting something other than such an estate. ConsultationIn the leading case of R v North and East Devon Health Authority ex parte Coughlan [2001] QB 213, Lord Woolf had identified the elements of effective consultation. It must be undertaken at a time when proposals are still at a formative stage; it must include sufficient reasons for particular proposals to allow those consulted to give intelligent consideration and an intelligent response; adequate time must be given for this purpose; and the product of consultation must be conscientiously taken into account when the ultimate decision is taken. Given this, the Court of Appeal found on 25 March 2009 that a consultation conducted by the boundary committee in the context of local government review had in the circumstances fallen short (see R (Breckland District Council and others) v Boundary Committee; R (East Devon District Council) v Boundary Committee [2009] EWCA Civ 239). Where the boundary committee erred was in its consultation on affordability. For the financial information provided was complicated and indigestible. And the ‘. . .need to explain the financial side of the draft proposals to the public in an understandable way was lost sight of or not understood’. As the court noted, the relevant statutory requirements included publishing enough material to enable those interested to respond intelligently. That, in turn, required the information to be published in a form which members of the public could understand. Therefore, any public authority contemplating a future consultation exercise will need to make sure that this will be conducted so as to be fit for its particular purpose – statutory or otherwise. There is always a public authority tension between what might be called ‘customer-centred governance’ and regulation. So while most local authorities will try to be ‘customer responsive’ to their council tax payers and other stakeholders, their regulatory functions mean that not everyone will always feel treated as a ‘customer’. For, in its nature, regulation will often cause pain to those subject to its penalties and processes. Equally though, local authorities have a responsibility to use their powers reasonably and proportionately. In other words, regulatory action should be exercised so that it bears a reasonable relation to the outcome required. Indeed, when in 2000 the government introduced a regulatory framework to govern the way in which public authorities use covert investigatory techniques, proportionality was enshrined within it. The measure in question was the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA). The act enables local authorities, where necessary, to conduct specified surveillance proportionately to achieve specified statutory objectives involving (among others) public safety, public health and assessing or collecting taxes. As the government points out, local authorities can use RIPA to address various social ills including: trading standards issues (eg loan sharks and rogue traders); dealing with counterfeit goods, unsafe toys and electrical items; addressing benefit fraud and council tax evasion; and environmental protection, for example stopping large-scale waste dumping, sale of unfit food and illegal ‘raves’. In recent times, however, use of RIPA has attracted some controversy. For instance, the Times of 17 April highlighted the case of the Dorset parents put under surveillance by their local authority to check that they were not trying to cheat school catchment regulations. The article pointed out that the couple and their three daughters were followed for three weeks after an anonymous informer wrongly told their authority that they were lying about their address to get their youngest child into the same school as her siblings. And concerns have been rumbling for a while. Back in July 2008, the Local Government Association (LGA) announced that its advice to authorities is that, except ‘in the most unusual and extreme of circumstances’, it is inappropriate to use RIPA powers for trivial matters and the ‘. . .leaders of the four political groups at the LGA also do not consider dog fouling or littering as matters which fall within the test of “necessary and proportionate”’. The Home Office has also indicated that ‘….it shouldn’t be necessary or appropriate to use RIPA-directed surveillance powers to observe people putting their rubbish bins out early for collection’. RIPA powers should be used ‘only where it is necessary and proportionate to do so’. In this context the Home Office on 17 April issued a public consultation paper on RIPA. As it did so, the government indicated that, in the light of recent concerns, it is particularly interested in how local authorities use RIPA to conduct investigations into local issues. In her introduction, the then home secretary Jacqui Smith said she shared concerns about how ‘a small number of local authorities have used techniques under RIPA when most of us would say it was not necessary or proportionate for them to do so’. She indicated that she did not ‘think it is right for RIPA to be used to investigate offences relating to dog fouling or to see whether people put their bins out a day early’. The LGA agreed, saying that all public bodies using surveillance powers ‘must rebuild public confidence by demonstrating this is done to help bring serious criminals to justice’. So the consultation asks whether the rank at which local authorities authorise the use of covert investigatory techniques be raised to ‘senior executive’. It also consults on whether elected councillors should be given a role in overseeing the way in which local authorities use such techniques. The government says that it would particularly like to hear from members of the public, campaigning groups and specialist organisations concerned with the provision of public authority services and human rights considerations. The consultation closes on 10 July and the paper can be accessed at: www.homeoffice.gov.uk/documents/cons-2009-ripa.center_img Nicholas Dobson, Pinsent Masons, Leedslast_img read more

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L.C. van Tiel Logistics joins Project Partners network

first_imgThe forwarder was founded six years ago and utilises its own fleet of trucks equipped for over-dimensional loads to move large or heavy cargoes. Meanwhile, organisers of the fourth Project Partners conference, recently held in Singapore, have pronounced it a great success. The conference was held in mid-January and participants enjoyed a concluding dinner at Singapore’s Sky on 57restaurant. The venue for the fifth conference is yet to be finalised.last_img

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Nippon Cargo grounds flights

first_imgThe entire grounding of flights started on June 17 after discrepancies in the maintenance logs for one of its eight B747-8F aircraft were uncovered during a routine inspection.The Japanese cargo specialist said in a statement that an inspection on June 14 showed a mismatch between the amount of lubricating oil present onboard flight JA14KZ and that recorded in the aircraft’s maintenance logs. The event was immediately reported to the Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLITT).”In the interests of caution and to ensure the safety of our operations, we have decided to temporarily ground all aircraft until all maintenance records have been confirmed as appropriate,” it said.NCA has been under intense scrutiny from the MLITT after failing to report several seemingly minor incidents involving its aircraft over the past year or so.www.nca.aerolast_img read more

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South Africans urged to promote local products

first_imgSouth Africa’s Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa says the government, big businesses and South Africans need to buy locally produced goods and services, and he made his case for that, at the annual Proudly SA, Buy Local summit in Johannesburg.“Our country is invested in establishing a strong manufacturing base. We are pursuing a path of industrial expansion so that we may extract greater value from our natural resources so that we may export more, and this we will be able to do, and through that we will be able to create jobs so that we can sustain high levels of economic growth and by so doing we will be able to ensure that our people get a much better life.”This annual summit is aimed at promoting local manufacturing and businesses to encourage an increase in the uptake of local goods and services in the country.It is also a call to action for ordinary consumers and procurement decision makers to increase their uptake of local products to ensure support of local job creation and stimulation of the local economy.Small businesses and local manufacturers and enterprises have put up stalls to showcase their goods and services to the dozens of buyers and potential investors.Proudly SA believes that one of the major ways to boost the South African economy is having confidence in what the country produces.last_img read more

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Activists fight FGM practice in Sierra Leone

first_imgSierra Leone has been focused on reviving itself following the deadly Ebola outbreak that ravaged the country.Now that that has been done, some of Sierra Leone’s other issues have returned, among them, the country’s more divisive cultural practices – and the people who fight to protect the most vulnerable.About 90% of the country’s women have undergone Female Genital Mutilation.The practice is quite a deeply embedded culture, and activists are now proposing to remove the act of cutting from the Bondo initiation.last_img read more

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