Category: gdsdlldz

Northern Power Systems distributed wind turbine hits grid parity

first_imgVermont Busness Magazine Northern Power Systems Corp (TSX: NPS(link is external)), a next generation renewable energy technology company based in Barre, has announced that substantial technology-driven operational improvements to its flagship Northern Power 100 kW wind turbine platform have been demonstrated to materially decrease the delivered Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of wind power produced by its turbines.”The current LCOE makes the Northern Power platform even more affordable for farmers, local businesses and on-site generation users trying to limit the ever increasing cost of electricity,” said Reinout Oussoren, VP of Global Sales. “Small wind is now an even more viable alternative for comme rcial and industrial users.”As highlighted in recent news from Bloomberg New Energy Finance(link is external), LCOE for renewables, including distributed wind and solar, continues to decrease while the same measure for fossil fuel increases. The LCOE — which includes the capital, operating, and any financing costs of an NPS 100 kW wind turbine over a 20-year+ operating life — has reached parity or better with electricity purchased from the grid.”When installed at locations with an average 6.5 meter per second wind speed,” Oussoren added, “a typical wind turbine installation will deliver energy costs of approximately 8 cents per kilowatt hour, with a Return on Equity (ROE) of up to 14 percent and payback in just over 5 years. If a customer leverages its purchase with 70% debt at a commercial rate of 7%, the ROE can exceed 30%.”Distributed generation is most effective for local businesses and farmers that wish to benefit from natural resources in their location in order to offset high electricity prices and lock in the cost of electricity. Wind turbines perform best where there is more wind, but even in areas with lower wind speeds, by combining wind and solar, one is able to complement the variations in natural resources and deliver an effective and stable local generation alternative.To learn more about how you can benefit from Northern Power Systems’ distributed generation products, including integrated microgrid solutions, please visitwww.northernpower.com(link is external).About Northern Power SystemsNorthern Power Systems designs, manufactures, and sells wind turbines and power technology products, and provides engineering development services and technology licenses for energy applications, into the global marketplace from its US headquarters and European offices.Northern Power Systems has almost 40 years’ experience in technologies and products generating renewable energy.Northern Power Systems currently manufactures the NPS™ 60 and NPS™ 100 turbines. With over 8.5 million run time hours across its global fleet, Northern Power wind turbines provide customers with clean, cost effective, reliable renewable energy.Patented next generation permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) technology uses fewer moving parts, delivers higher energy capture, and provides increased reliability due to reduced maintenance and downtime.Northern Power Systems’ FlexPhase™ power converter platform uses patented converter architecture and advanced controls technology for advanced grid support and generation applications.Northern Power Systems offers comprehensive in‐house development services, inc luding systems level engineering, advanced drivetrains, power electronics, PM machine design, and remote monitoring systems to the energy industry.Some of the world’s largest manufacturers license the company’s next generation technology and IP for their utility and distributed wind products and markets.BARRE, VT–(Marketwired – December 09, 2015) – Northern Power Systems Corp www.northernpower.com(link is external).last_img read more

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The making of Brown Bottle Cheddar: A Vermont collaboration

first_imgOtter Creek Brewing Company LLC,Vermont Business Magazine Last December, staff from Healthy Living Market & Cafe and Otter Creek Brewing Company traveled to Vermont Farmstead Cheese Company to collaborate on an alehouse cheddar. The final product, Brown Bottle Cheddar, was created with milk sourced from Vermont Farmstead’s dairy cows, and Backseat Berner IPA from Otter Creek. Seth Walker of Healthy Living coordinated the effort, bringing the three local companies from the Northern, Central and Southern parts of the state together to make a beautiful product for the community to experience. He said: “Every part of this cheese is Vermont. I’m honored to have had the privilege to collaborate with these great local artisan producers. Enriching the communities we love is a big part of our mission values. I think this cheese is the perfect embodiment of that vision.” After nearly seven months of aging, the cheese has finally arrived. Available exclusively at Healthy Living Market in South Burlington, VT and Saratoga Springs, NY. While the cheese is a very well-balanced cheddar, the flavor of Backseat Berner really comes through. Rick Woods, owner and head cheesemaker at Vermont Farmstead guided this adventure, ensuring that the cheese we created met his high standards. He said of the project: “Making the Brown Bottle Cheddar combines my two greatest loves: beer and cheese. This particular batch has wonderful upfront cheddar flavor and finishes with a slightly sweet malt note. I am very pleased with the results and all the help we had from the Healthy Living crew!! Cheers.” Mikaela Shea, Marketing Creative Manager at Otter Creek said: “We were psyched to be a part of this local collaboration with two of our favorite items, cheese and beer! We’re thankful for Healthy Living inviting us to be a part of this and for sharing this tasty product with the community.” About Healthy Living Market & Cafe: Healthy Living Market is a local, organic and natural foods supermarket and cafe with stores located in Burlington, Vermont and Saratoga Springs, New York. Founded in Vermont in 1986, Healthy Living has been committed from day one to creating a premier grocery store experience to sell the finest and cleanest food at the fairest prices possible while supporting local farmers and producers. In addition it is committed to enriching its communities and teaching its guests how to live healthier lifestyles through education and entertainment, known as ‘edu-tainment’. Healthy Living is a triple bottom line, mission/vision/values Company from the top down.About Vermont Farmstead Cheese Company: The Vermont Farmstead Cheese Company began as a community effort to save a local dairy farm from being repurposed in South Woodstock, Vermont. Since then VFCC has become an award-winning cheese company, making delicious old-world cheeses with Vermont authenticity and creativity. Castleton Crackers joined VFCC in 2013, sharing the same vision. About Otter Creek Brewing Company: Vermont’s Otter Creek Brewing Company has been hitting, hopping and dosing brews with creativity since 1991. Following the addition of a state-of-the-art brew house and more canning capacity, the OCB Crew is continuing down the path of innovation, throwing a bit of kindness into the kettle whenever possible. OCB’s hop-soaked ales and lagers are available throughout the Northeast and mid-Atlantic regions.Source: Healthy Living Market & Cafe For more information visit www.healthylivingmarket.com(link is external).  VBM vermontbiz.comlast_img read more

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Scarritt raises $177,000 for Feeding Tampa Bay

first_imgScarritt raises $177,000 for Feeding Tampa Bay Tampa attorney Tom Scarritt was named the Rotary District 6890 Rotarian of the Year for 2020-2021 for his work in creating a GoFundMe fundraising effort in Rotary’s Million Meals Challenge, which raised over $177,000 to contribute to Feeding Tampa Bay for the purchase, assembly, and delivery of food for four counties of West and Central Florida.These funds bought over 885,000 meals for neighbors, friends, and fellow citizens lacking sufficient food for their families. Over 98 cents of every dollar donated goes directly to providing groceries to help our people get back on a path of dignity.For more information, visit https://www.gofundme.com/f/feeding-the-hungry-in-west-amp-central-florida. Oct 02, 2020 Top Storieslast_img read more

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MaKenna Partain is a consistent force for Gophers softball

first_imgWhile the Gophers would go on to lose 2-1 to Baylor in extras, they bounced back on Sunday with their second victory over Tulsa on the weekend. The win put the Minnesota at 8-6 on the season, two games above .500 in a treacherous nonconference schedule for a team that head coach Jamie Trachsel says is still finding its identity. As the Gophers look to find that identity, Partain, a senior and leader on the team, has been impressed with her younger teammates, who have embraced the team’s culture. “We have a lot of upperclassmen and we don’t really have so many underclassmen in our lineup, so I think having them perform is awesome,” Partain said. “It’s just been really exciting to watch them grow and really buy into the process of everything we believe in on our team.” Prior to the start of the season, Trachsel challenged the Gophers to embrace the rising expectations for the team following its first ever appearance in the Women’s College World Series. “Even for our returners, [we want] to see how they handle, embrace the expectations from last year and in their own individual goals along with our team,” Trachsel said. After Minnesota’s first three weekends to play, it’s evident Partain has accepted Trachsel’s challenge, building on her incredible consistency from her first three seasons. MaKenna Partain is a consistent force for Gophers softballThe senior ranks second on the team with a .408 batting average and 11 RBIs.Jasmin KempJunior MaKenna Partain waits to bat on Saturday, May 25, 2019 at the Jane Sage Cowles Stadium. Nolan O’HaraFebruary 27, 2020Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintWhen the Gophers softball team needs a hit, it knows it can count on the bat of MaKenna Partain. The Gophers’ senior infielder has been a mark of consistency for the team in the last four years. Partain has hit at least .375 in each of her four seasons at Minnesota, and has 232 hits, 131 RBI and a .382 batting average for her career. Her offensive production has only progressed in 2020, ranking second on the team in batting average, hitting .408, and her 11 RBIs also rank second on the team. For Partain, offense is a “mentality game” and staying level mentally leads to that connection and consistency at the plate.  “I don’t really try to think about a lot when I’m up at the plate. I just try to think about attacking balls over the plate and just trying to do whatever I can to get on base for my team,” Partain said. “Any way I can get on is any way I can have someone else behind me hit me in.” Partain hasn’t only shown consistency at the plate, but also in the field. Starting at second base through the Gophers’ first 14 games, she has only one error and a .974 fielding percentage. Partain’s defensive abilities were highlighted in the bottom of the sixth in a 1-1 game against Baylor. She made a diving play on a ground ball at second, flipping it from her glove to shortstop Carlie Brandt for Minnesota’s last out of the inning. The play made SportsCenter Top-10 and helped the Gophers force the game into extra innings.“I knew there was two outs, so I knew if there was any ball in play the runner would be going pretty hard,” Partain said. “I just dove and tried to flip it as fast as I could and luckily Carlie came across.” last_img read more

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EU notes rising resistance in common foodborne pathogens

first_imgNew surveillance data from European Union (EU) member states on pathogenic bacteria from human, animals, and food shows rising resistance to a medically important antibiotic.Analysis of zoonotic and indicator bacteria by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) found that resistance to the critically important antibiotic ciprofloxacin is common in certain species of Salmonella isolated from people, while resistance to ciprofloxacin ranged from high to very high in Campylobacter recovered from people, food-producing animals, and poultry meat. Those findings continue trends observed in previous surveillance reports.The data, submitted by 28 EU member states from routine surveillance monitoring conducted in 2017 and 2018, also show that more than 28% of Salmonella isolates from human infections are multidrug-resistant.The summary report focuses on antibiotic resistance levels in Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia coli, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus—the main infection-causing pathogens that pass from food-producing animals to people. The bacteria analyzed are from humans, pigs, calves, broiler chickens, and turkeys, with additional analysis of isolates recovered from poultry meat.Salmonella and Campylobacter are two of the leading bacterial causes of foodborne disease in people. While most cases of salmonellosis and campyblobacteriosis don’t require antibiotics, ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, is commonly used to treat more severe infections.Resistance common in Salmonella, CampylobacterIn Salmonella obtained from humans, the overall proportion of isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin was 12.5%, with extremely high proportions of resistance found in specific Salmonella serovars, including Salmonella Kentucky (87.5%). Resistance to high concentrations of ciprofloxacin in certain types of Salmonella rose from 1.7% in 2016 to 4.6% in 2018.As in previous years, high proportions of human Salmonella isolates were also resistant to sulfonamides (30.5%), tetracyclines (28.8%), and ampicillin (25.9%)—antibiotics that are commonly used in food-animal production. Resistance to these antibiotics was particularly high in Salmonella serovars commonly found in pigs.Monitoring of human infections also detected a handful of cases of carbapenem-resistant Salmonella—the first reports of carbapenem-resistant Salmonella in people that were not related to travel outside the EU.”Finding carbapenem resistance in foodborne bacteria in the EU is a concern,” ECDC Chief Scientist Mike Catchpole, PhD, said in a press release.In Salmonella and indicator E coli isolates recovered from animals and food, the findings were similar, with resistance to ampicillin, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines frequently detected. In addition, resistance to fluoroquinolones was high in Salmonella and E coli from broilers, turkeys, and poultry meat, and multidrug-resistance was observed at high levels in Salmonella recovered from the carcasses of pigs (47.4%), broilers (32.7%), and calves (22%).In Campylobacter bacteria recovered from human infections, surveillance found that the EU average for ciprofloxacin resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli—the two species of focus for resistance monitoring—was 59.3% and 65.2%, respectively. Combined resistance to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin (another important drug for treating campylobacteriosis) was low in C jejuni (1%) and moderate in C coli (11%).But Estonia, Finland, Italy, and Spain reported combined resistance in more than 20% of C coli isolates, while Portugal reported combined resistance in more than 50% of C coli isolates. Combined resistance to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin is significant because it leaves few options for treating severe Campylobacter infections.Some encouraging findingsAmong the encouraging findings from the report are decreasing trends in the detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) or AmpC-producing E coli in food-producing animals in 12 countries from 2015 through 2018, an important finding given the ability of ESBL/AmpC-producing E coli to cause severe, multidrug-resistant infections people. In addition, increasing trends in susceptibility to all antibiotics in E coli from food-producing animals was observed in 6 countries.EFSA officials say these findings indicate that some countries are seeing success in efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance in food-animal production.”The positive findings in food-producing animals are encouraging because they are a sign of improvement,” EFSA Chief Scientist Marta Hugas, PhD, said. “However, we need to further investigate the reasons behind this change.”last_img read more

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Udall, Senators Again Call On Trump To Immediately And Fully Use All Defense Production Act Authorities

first_imgU.S. Sen. Tom UdallU.S. SENATE News:WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) joined Senators Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) and Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) along with 17 of their colleagues Friday in condemning President Trump’s partial invocation of the Defense Production Act (DPA), which ignored other key titles in the Act that provide essential tools for rapidly scaling up our national response to the spread of the novel coronavirus. The Senators are calling on President Trump to immediately implement all Defense Production Act powers under Titles I, III, and VII to massively scale up production of testing kits, Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) such as respirators and gloves, ventilators, and other critical materials that our country needs during the coronavirus emergency. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) estimates the United States could need up to 3.5 billion respirators during the coronavirus emergency, but the Strategic National Stockpile holds only 12 million respirators. Congress amended DPA in 2009 to explicitly extend those authorities to support domestic preparedness and response to national emergencies, such as the coronavirus pandemic.  “Our domestic industries are ready and waiting for the call to respond to the critical ongoing shortages of key medical equipment and supplies,” wrote the senators in their letter to President Trump. “But they need capital, federal contracts, and other assurances in order to act. We can activate America’s ingenuity and resolve by immediately providing that financial incentive and direction through the full use of DPA authorities. We urge you to move forward in using these authorities immediately, for the sake of the health and well-being of the American people.” The president’s executive order issued days ago invokes only components of Title I of the DPA and delegates its authorities to Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar. In their letter, the Senators explain that implementing Title III authorities would allow the executive branch to provide financial incentives to industry, including loans, direct purchases, and purchase commitments, as well as to further help repurpose private manufacturing capabilities to enable manufacturers to produce the materials we need in this crisis, something other countries like South Korea and France are doing. The Senators also highlight that Title VII empowers the President to establish voluntary agreements with private industry and direct coordinated industry efforts and production.In their letter, the senators also urged President Trump to follow the advice of his own public health officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Health and Human Services and stop referring to the current coronavirus in an inflammatory and xenophobic manner. In addition to Udall, Markey, and Brown the letter is also signed by Senators Tammy Baldwin (D-Wisc.), Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii), Angus King (I-Maine), Doug Jones (D-Ala.), Tom Carper (D-Del.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Chris Murphy (D-Conn.), Jack Reed (D-R.I.), Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), Mark Warner (D-Va.), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), Bob Casey (D-Penn.), and Tina Smith (D-Minn.)A copy of the letter can be found HERE and below.last_img read more

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UK to receive LNG for the first time in 20 years

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Alternative Hydrogen Solutions retains Legacy Consulting services

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Jurisdiction

first_img The first and second claimants were two companies, R&D and Templeco. The third claimant was an individual (SF) who controlled the two companies. The defendant was a Dutch bankruptcy trustee of an English registered company company, PVL, which had its place of business in the Netherlands. An ‘Intra-Group Asset Transfer Agreement‘ and related share sale agreement took place between PVL and the claimants in June 2009, shortly before the defendant became administrator. Under that agreement, PVL’s intellectual property rights were vested in R&D for a consideration of £3m paid for by a transfer of shares in R&D to PVL. PVL then sold the R&D shares to Templeco in exchange for SF waiving £3.1m of his loans to PVL. The defendant maintained that the intra-group asset transfer agreement was a disposal of assets in fraud of creditors. The claimants denied that it was. At that point, a supervisory judge was appointed and the defendant made a declaration pursuant to Dutch law that the intra group transfer was void. On 27 July 2009, a settlement agreement was made between the parties to facilitate the sale by the defendant of the disputed intellectual property rights. The claimants maintained that, in a letter sent before the settlement and which had induced the settlement, the defendant had agreed that PVL’s indebtedness to SF was at least €3m. On 4 March 2011, the claimants issued proceedings in the English court seeking damages for misrepresentation and/or breach of contract. They served the defendant at his professional address in the Netherlands without seeking permission to serve out on the ground that Civil Procedure Rule 6.33(1) applied because the defendant was domiciled in a member state. The defendant filed an acknowledgment of service on 6 April, but failed to challenge jurisdiction within 28 days, as required under CPR 58.7(2). The claimants served their particulars of claim on 25 May. In due course, the defendant sought to challenge the jurisdiction of the court and applied for an extension of time to do so, and, if that was granted, submitted that the proceedings should be stayed or dismissed. His primary ground was that the relevant European legislation was not Council Regulation (EC) 44/2001 (on jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters) (the Judgments Regulation) which replicated an identical provision in the Brussels Convention, on which the claimants relied, but Council Regulation (EC) 1346/2000 (on insolvency proceedings) (the Insolvency regulation). That regulation accorded jurisdiction to the law of the state in which the bankruptcy proceedings were opened, in the instant case, the Netherlands. The main issues in the case were: (i) whether the defendant should be permitted to challenge the jurisdiction even though he was out of time; (ii) whether the bankruptcy exception in article 1.2(b) of the Judgments Regulation applied so as to exclude the application of that regulation; and (iii) if the bankruptcy exception applied, whether the proceedings should be stayed or dismissed on the basis of forum non conveniens. The resolution of the first issue depended on whether there was substance in the challenge that the proceedings did not fall within the Judgments Regulation because they were excluded by article 1.2(b) which provided that the Judgments Regulation was not to apply to bankruptcy, proceedings relating to the winding-up of insolvent companies or other legal persons, judicial arrangements, compositions and analogous proceedings. Consideration was given to the case of Gourdain (Liquidator of Soc. Fromme France Manutention) v Nadler [1979] ECR 733 (Gourdain) which stated to the effect that if decisions relating to bankruptcy and winding-up were to be excluded from the scope of the Brussels Convention (the convention) they had to derive directly from the bankruptcy. In relation to (ii) the claimants submitted, inter alia, that the claims in the proceedings were independant claims under the general law and that the derivation in Gourdain referred to juridical derivation and not factual derivation which was ascertained by focusing on the pleaded claim and not the facts. In relation to (iii) the claimants contended that notwithstanding that the applicable law of the settlement agreement and any collateral contract was Dutch law, England was the appropriate forum as, inter alia, the characteristic place of performance of the contract according to that applicable Dutch law was England. The application would be allowed. (1) The starting point in determining what proceedings were excluded from article 1.2(b) of the Judgments Regulation was the decision in Gourdain where the European Court of Justice had stated that ‘it is necessary if decisions relating to bankruptcy and winding-up are to be excluded from the scope of the convention, that they must derive directly from the bankruptcy or winding-up, and be so closely connected with the proceedings for the liquidation des biens or the reglement judicire’. It was therefore necessary to ascertain whether the legal foundation of an application was based on the law relating to bankruptcy and winding-up as interpreted for the purpose of the convention. It was clear that the fact that a claim factually depended on the bankruptcy did not in itself suffice to bring it within article 1.2(b). However, even though a factual derivation was not sufficient in all cases it did not mean that it never sufficed and that a direct juridical derivation was necessary. It was the closeness of the link, in the sense of the Gourdain case-law, between a court action and the insolvency proceedings that was decisive for the purposes of deciding whether the exclusion in art 1.2(b) of the Judgments Regulation was applicable. A key factor in concluding that there was a link between a court and insolvency proceedings was the extent of the liquidator’s powers (see [47], [55], [58], [64], [66], [67] of the judgment) In the instant case, the proceedings were excluded from the ambit of the Judgments Regulation by article 1.2(b). All that the defendant had done as PVL’s trustee in bankruptcy had been subject to the supervision of the supervisory judge. Further, the underlying transactions about which the claimants had brought their claims were negotiations and a settlement between them and the defendant acting as the trustee of PVL’s bankruptcy. The dispute concerned the insolvency process/procedures. The aim of the defendant’s declaration was to preserve the rights of the general body of creditors over PVL’s assets. The post-insolvency declaration that the ‘Intra-Group Asset Transfer Arrangement/hive-down’ was void as a fraudulent transaction undoubtedly qualified under the Gourdain formulation. On the evidence, the negotiations and the settlement did also. The settlement was the direct consequence of the exercise by the defendant of power he had under Dutch law in relation to the conduct of PVL’s insolvency proceedings. To regard the statements made in negotiations to settle a dispute about the way to conduct the insolvency process in the future and the resulting agreements as directly derived from and closely connected with the insolvency proceedings and thus within the Gourdain formulation was not to give article 1.2(b) of the Judgments Regulation and the Insolvency Regulation too broad an interpretation (see [68]-[71], [80] of the judgment). Conflict of laws – Challenge to jurisdiction Gourdain v Nadler: 133/78 [1979] 3 CMLR 180 applied; SCT Industri AB i Likvidation v Alpenblume AB: C-111/08 [2009] All ER (D) 47 (Jul) applied; Seagon v Deko Marty Belgium NV: C-339/07 [2009] All ER (D) 112 (Feb) considered; German Graphics Graphische Maschinen GmbH v Schee: C-292/08 [2009] All ER (D) 75 (Sep) considered; Bowles (decd), Re; Hayward v Jackson [2003] 2 All ER 387 considered; Byers v Yacht Bull Corp [2010] All ER (D) 217 (Feb) considered. (2) A proper case in which to exercise the court’s discretion in which to (extend time was one where the administration of justice would not be affected by granting an extension, whereas a failure to do so might involve a case being heard in England which might otherwise not have been. If when the merits of the challenge to jurisdiction were considered it could be seen that there was no prejudice to the claimant, that was a proper case for granting the extension (see [79] of the judgment). Applying established law, in all the circumstances the delay was such that there was a strong case for an extension of time (see [77] of the judgment). Sawyer v Atari Interactive Inc [2007] All ER (D) 36 (Mar) applied; Texan Management Ltd v Pacific Electric Wire & Cable Company Ltd [2009] UKPC 46 considered. (3) In the instant case, the claimants’ submissions in relation to the appropriate forum for the proceedings would be rejected. First, it had already been decided that the instant claims satisfied the Gourdain formulation. Secondly, a Dutch court would be better placed to apply Dutch law, which was the applicable law of the contracts and the transactions between the parties (see [90] of the judgment). Charles Samek QC and Charlotte Davies (instructed by Withers LLP) for the claimants; Stephen Davies QC (instructed by Brown Rudnick LLP) for the defendant. Polymer Vision R & D Ltd and others v Van Dooren: Queen’s Bench Division, Commercial Court: 17 November 2011last_img read more

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Esbjerg breaks records for third year running

first_img2013 profits increased to DKK78.0 million (USD14.31 million) from DKK60.1 million (USD11.1 million) in 2012. Revenue surged 25 percent year-on-year to DKK215.5 million (USD39.81 million).The Port of Esbjerg attributed the growth to increased activities in the offshore wind sector, with 1.6 GW of capacity being shipped from the gateway during 2013 – which is the same amount of capacity installed across Europe during the same period, says the gateway. It also experienced growth fueled by oil and gas shipments, and the opening of a series of new ro-ro routes marked the year.In 2013, the Port of Esbjerg invested DKK130.5 million (USD24.11 million) in the continued expansion of the port. The total investments for the past five years add up to DKK 803.0 million (USD143.34 million).Port director, Ole Ingrisch, said: “2013 has been another excellent year for the Port of Esbjerg and a year in which we harvested the benefits of our investments in recent years. We are experiencing strong demand for our facilities and the new areas in our new area, Østhavnen, which opened in 2013.”The report confirms the strong position of the Port of Esbjerg and of the companies based at the port, says port chairman Flemming Enevoldsen: “The results of 2013 bring a very satisfying end to the roll-out of our ten year old master plan for the Port of Esbjerg. Today, Esbjerg is a leading Northern European port; we are the market leader in offshore wind and we are Denmark’s undisputed hub for the offshore industry and ro-ro. And we are part of a very strong business cluster.”The Port of Esbjerg has now laid out its strategy for the next 10 years, and will continue to focus on ro-ro, oil and gas and offshore wind as its main foundations of the business.”We are looking into the future with optimism and we continue to adapt to continued growth in our core businesses. However, we depend on political will to ensure stable and long-term framework conditions for both the port as well as for the industries based at the port. It is therefore crucial to eliminate the current uncertainty about the roll-out plan for offshore wind,” Enevoldsen observed.  www.portesbjerg.dklast_img read more

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