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Campagnolo debuts all-new mid-range Potenza 11 road gruppo

first_imgCampagnolo Potenza gets a new set of mechanical shifters that offer the ergonomics of more expensive groups in an affordable package with a composite body and aluminum lever. The right shifter uses a new thumb paddle with a design trickled down from EPS for easy access either in the drops of on the hoods. It allows you to upshift up to 3 gears at once, with single press downshifts. The new Potenza group looks to slot in just below Chorus in the lineup. In that place it signals another phase out of the nice looking and simple Athena gruppo that we put to cross use last summer. While we only have images of the gloss black components, we’re told that a mostly silver groupset will be availble for those looking for a classic build.Campagnolo seems to think that the <900€ component group will go head-to-head with Ultegra for the everyday rider, who doesn’t want to shell out more for the carbon-infused kit. Potenza gets a new skeleton brake set too for light and powerful rim braking.While Athena had been a well performing 11 speed group in the Campagnolo lineup, it had missed out on some of the tech of the Record and Chorus groups. The new Potenza seems to pick up all the slack that had been missing, and should make for a solid all-around drivetrain for those still looking for either the stealthy black or more polished silver drivetrain.Campagnolo.com Before Campagnolo let slip their in-development and forthcoming Campy Tech Labs disc brakes, they lured us in with talk of a completely new everyman drivetrain groupset. The new Potenza 11 line pulls a lot of tech from the carbon-heavy Super Record, Record, and Chorus lines and reapplies it into an aluminum drivetrain that will likely be a lot more affordable. Take a closer first look with us after the break, and we’ll give the highlights… The left shifter gets three clicks to deliver easy upshifts. Campy describes it as not needing to be adjusted based on cassette position, but it does deliver trim functionality for use in the little ring. From all the way down on the small ring you get no rub in the bigger 8 cogs, and one click trims for use in the smaller 8. The second and third click bring you up to the big ring with optimal chainline for the full cluster, though. The first click back down gives you the smaller (faster) 8 again, and the second click down for the big cogs out back.The hollow-forged aluminum Potenza crankset shares the newer 4-bolt layout that offers 53/39, 52/36 & 50/34 hard anodized aluminum chainring setups with one spider.  Unlike the costlier cranks Potenza sticks with the steel Power Torque axle. The group also gets an upgrade front derailleur with a long arm, and steel cage for fast shifting.Besides just getting a new rear derailleur hat follows the current Campagnolo Revolution 11+ look from the high-end groups, Potenza adds some new derailleur tech. First off, it uses a reinforced “technopolymer” body and forged aluminum plates to keep weight down, while maintaining durability. But of even more interest is that it will be available also in a longer medium cage version, designed for a 11-32 cassette, a first for Campy. That 11-32 will be joined by more typical 11-25, 11-27, 11-29 & 12-27 options, each of which uses a pinned triplet on the big end and 8 loose cogs with alloy spacers.last_img read more

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Who Will Be the 2018 Broadway.com Star of the Year? Vote Now!

first_img Christiani Pitts Joshua HenryBroadway triple threat Joshua Henry became a three-time Tony nominee and a Grammy nominee for his groundbreaking performance as Billy Bigelow in Carousel. Not only was his “Soliliquy” one of the standout performance moments of the theatrical season; he took on a coveted, classic musical theater role traditionally played by white male leads, showcasing how Broadway continues to break down barriers in the entertainment world. Beyond Broadway, he also took on the greatest role of his career—becoming a father offstage. The halls are decked, the Christmas cookies are frosted (and let’s be honest—taste-tested!) and “best of the year” props are being handed out left and right. Well now it’s your turn to have a say! Select Broadway.com’s 2018 Star of the Year—from Tony-winning trailblazers to thrilling new faces, we’ve choosen 11 nominees that epitomized what it means to be a Broadway star, both onstage and off. Now it’s up to you to pick the winner by voting by Thursday, December 13 at 11:59PM. Choose wisely! Glenda JacksonGlenda Jackson returned to the Broadway stage for the first time in 30 years in 2018 (she was a little busy serving as a Member of Parliament and taking the London stage by storm), and what a return it was. The Academy Award winner garnered her first Tony Award for Three Tall Women, declaring, “I’m one of the oldest people, I think, ever to have stood on this platform receiving this award.” The towering talent is not done with Broadway yet—Jackson will grace the Great White Way in 2019 as King Lear. Patti MurinIn 2018, Patti Murin rose to the challenge of bringing the iconic character of Anna to spectacular life in Disney’s Frozen on Broadway. In doing so, she has redefined the Disney princess on and offstage. Despite her handsome husband Colin Donnell, their perfect pets and a dream job, Murin has been exceptionally candid this year about the parts of her life that are less than ideal, speaking out about mental health and sexual assault. Starring in a big Broadway hit and using her platform to help others? Sounds like a star to us. Michael Urie Nathan LaneBroadway legend Nathan Lane became a three-time Tony winner in 2018, demonstrating brilliant versatility as a performer playing hard-edged real-life lawyer and Donald Trump mentor Roy Cohn in the Tony-winning revival of Angels in America. His emotional Tony acceptance speech made us tear up, saying, “This award is a lovely vote of confidence that I’ve been on the right path.” He also made us laugh in 2018 with stories of his sassy pup Mabel and his perfect coming out quip. A true man of the theater, he will return to Broadway in 2019 in Gary. Stephanie J. BlockTwo-time Tony nominee Stephanie J. Block is making audiences believe in life after love at the Neil Simon Theatre and living up to her character: “Star.” Dressed to kill in skin-tight sequins and feathers, Block is strutting her stuff as the four-letter diva in The Cher Show. Not only is she delivering a powerhouse performance as one of the three Chers; in taking on this role, SJB is truly flaunting her inner and outer beauty both on and off stage. Bonus points for, just like her alter ego, speaking up and having her say on Twitter in the best way! (Art by Ryan Casey for Broadway.com) Lauren Ridloff Christiani PittsAfter making her Broadway debut in A Bronx Tale, Christiani Pitts took center stage in 2018, turning out a stunning leading lady performance in Broadway’s mammoth musical King Kong. It’s difficult not to take one’s eyes off of her when she’s onstge—even when she’s standing next to a 2,000 pound monkey. She has been determined to make classic silver screen character Ann Darrow the empowered heroine today’s audiences need, shattering “damsel in distress” stereotypes both onstage and off. Beth LeavelTony winner Beth Leavel is a self-proclaimed worker bee, and the fruits of her labor were fully realized in 2018. After a summer turn as Mama Rose, she stepped into her “evil twin” role as Dee Dee Allen in the hilarious musical The Prom, reuniting with Drowsy Chaperone creators Casey Nicholaw and Bob Martin. Audiences that catch Leavel’s outrageous performance can clearly see that wonderful things happen when they work together. A powerhouse wherever she goes, she also belted her face off and rocked a gold jumpsuit…in the freezing cold. Michael UrieMichael Urie is making Harvey Fierstein’s Tony-winning role in Torch Song his own on the Great White Way. Always ready for the next challenge, Urie will take his incredible performance on the road in a national tour after the Broadway run ends. Seems like this stage and screen star knows how to keep busy; he spent his “break” between Torch Song off-Broadway and Torch Song on Broadway playing Hamlet. This is not to say that Urie is all work and no play. Kudos to him for making the Patti LuPone cell phone snatch story even funnier. Nathan Lane Lauren RidloffIt’s impressive enough that Lauren Ridloff made the leap from Kenny Leon’s ASL teacher with no professional stage experience to the star of the acclaimed director’s revival of Children of a Lesser God. Nabbing a Tony nomination for her stunning debut was truly remarkable (as was her fierce fashion on Tony night). Though she didn’t take home the trophy, Ridloff’s story is beyond inspiring. Also—have you ever experienced better on stage chemistry/offstage BFF goals than she had with co-star Joshua Jackson? Seeing them together was always a treat! Elaine May Erika HenningsenErika Henningsen is starring in one of the “groolest” musicals on the Great White Way. But unlike delightfully evil queen bee Regina George, this young talent is all about welcoming others inside the inner circle, specifically Broadway.com viewers. Henningsen has given Mean Girls fans a warm welcome backstage with her super fun vlog Too Grool for School, a perfect companion to her heartfelt performance in the show. Not only an onstage inspiration, she also encouraged fans to hit the voting polls and give homes to adorable foster dogs! View Comments Star Files Thanks for voting! Stephanie J. Block Joshua Henry Patti Murin View All (10) Glenda Jackson Elaine MayScreenwriter, film director, actress and comedy queen Elaine May returned to the Great White Way for the first time in over 50 years to star in Kenneth Longergan’s heart-wrenching memory play The Waverly Gallery. Though she’s a known expert at making audiences laugh, she wins and breaks hearts in the show as Gladys Green, a feisty, chatty grandmother suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Though audience members best have the tissues ready for this play and her performance in it, it seems May has maintained her brilliant sense of humor off-stage. Erika Henningsenlast_img read more

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Garmin goes 360-degree with waterproof VIRB 360 camera

first_img Related Garmin has launched VIRB 360, a compact, rugged and fully spherical 360-degree camera. The waterproof VIRB 360 is billed as an easy-to-use camera that captures impressive high-quality video up to 5.7K/30fps, with four built-in microphones to ensure everything sounds as good as it looks in any direction. Whether users are kayaking down river rapids or mountain biking through rough terrain, the VIRB 360’s 4K Spherical Stabilization aims to make every video smooth and steady.With the VIRB 360, users capture video with automatic in-camera stitching up to 4K/30fps. Videos are uploaded for editing or sharing instantaneously. Taking advantage of its built-in GPS and numerous other sensors, the VIRB 360 provides owners with customizable G-Metrix data overlays in a 360-degree augmented reality setting.“The VIRB 360 lets you relive personal experiences and share them with your friends – from a different point of view, every single time,” said Dan Bartel, Garmin Vice President of Global Consumer Sales. “VIRB 360 owners will no longer need to worry about trying to capture the perfect angle or setting up the perfect shot. The camera’s easy-to-use feature set will make even the most inexperienced users look like experts.”Garmin offers a free downloadable VIRB Mobile app and desktop software to edit, stabilize, share and add data overlays to any VIRB 360 video content – features that arguably make the VIRB 360 easier to use than most other 360 cameras. Boasting conveniently simple one-touch button controls, the VIRB 360 also incorporates helpful voice control options to start and stop recordings, snap photos and more. And to make the most of ‘in-the-moment’ experiences, the VIRB 360 features livestream capabilities to post to YouTube or Facebook Live with a compatible smartphone or tablet.The VIRB 360 offers a rechargeable, one-hour battery life while recording. Beyond video, the VIRB 360 can take stitched-in-camera, 360-degree, 15 megapixel spherical photos. Photo modes include single capture, burst shooting, time lapse and Travelapse. Additionally, the camera is equipped with a sunlight-readable display for users to identify battery life, storage capacity and video modes. The VIRB 360 supports Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, ANT+, and NFC (one-tap connection with Android devices) connectivity.Offering a wealth of flexibility and range, the VIRB 360 is compatible with industry-leading virtual reality headsets and live playback through the free VIRB Mobile app. What’s more, the camera is compatible with Apple and Android devices, and comes with its own unique tripod/handgrip. The VIRB 360 uses replaceable microSD memory6 cards of up to 128GB (sold separately).The Garmin VIRB 360 has a suggested retail price of £649.99 and is expected to be available in June.www.Garmin.com/VIRB360last_img read more

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It’s USDC-MDFL Bar renewal time

first_img I t’s USDC-MDFL Bar renewal time The 2010-2011 renewal process for the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida opened June 1.All attorneys who are active members of the Bar of the USDC-MDFL as of May 1 have been mailed a renewal form.The renewal fee is $20, which covers a two-year period (July 15, 2010, through July 14, 2012) year.Attorney renewal forms and fees not submitted in accordance with the procedures and within the time line established by the court will result in the attorney being considered delinquent and must reapply for new membership at a cost of $165 before practicing before this Court. Renewal forms and fees are due July 15.More information about the USDC-MDFL renewal process, including a help ful “ Frequently Asked Questions ” page, is available at the court’s website, www.flmd.uscourts.gov ; go to the “ Attorney Resources ” heading and then click on “ Attorney Renewals. ” It’s USDC-MDFL Bar renewal time June 1, 2010 Regular Newslast_img read more

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Fully commit to tech in order to boost efficiency

first_imgThe life of an investment manager has changed immeasurably over the past decade, due largely to the impact of technological advances. Take a look back at the late 1990s and early 2000s and your average investment manager was running around town collating data from their real estate portfolio on a very granular level.They had huge swathes of details to report on including tenant leases, rent, building maintenance, etc. This formed the basis of all their asset management and investment decisions. You can see where problems arose.Fast forward in time and they may still be running around town with the same vigour but technology has enabled much smarter time management.Technology is used in real estate for a number of reasons: to drive efficiencies; accommodate growth; increase transparency; maintain auditability; and deliver increased levels of central control.This can be through automation of menial tasks, the speeding up of accounting processes, regular reporting to investors or simply through the ease of having vital data at the touch of a button.Despite investment managers embracing technology overall, the sector is largely still playing catch-up when it comes to management systems. Obstacles are often unwittingly introduced when implementing new technology systems and ironically can result in the exact opposite outcome to what was intended: efficiency savings.So why, in many cases, has the industry taken its eye off the ball when it comes to making tech work for them? Investment managers, whether commercial, residential, retail or industrial, have to ask themselves what it is that they want from technology. What role does it need to play within their business? What responsibility do they have to their investors and how can they utilise technology to better manage property investments to maximise returns for their investors?The only way to make sure technology is helping with its main objective of efficiency is through a single stack system from as few suppliers as possibleIn many cases, property companies, pension funds and public sector landlords will simply want better levels of property management and financial accounting.The capability of technology is vast and flexible, allowing the highest level of accounting right down to the transactional level of a single rent payment or an individual supplier invoice.Firms are all too often implementing new systems and bolt-ons to plug gaps or even prop up current technology systems.It can become a real nightmare when, for example, there are five different suppliers of five different products within the technology solution.It is very easy to fall into this trap where suddenly there are several different systems and providers being used. If something goes wrong with the technology each supplier will point the finger at the other and go round in circles before the root of the problem is discovered.Practicality and operational risksAs well as accountability, using several suppliers also throws up practicality and operational risks. The only way to really guard against those risks and make sure technology is helping, and not hindering, with its main objective of efficiency is through a single stack system from as few suppliers as possible.To get as close to a single system as possible, a degree of due diligence needs to be carried out. Does the supplier have a sufficient level of resources? Are there high levels of reinvestment in the business to keep the product at the forefront of technology and forefront of functionality? Is the system fully web-enabled? What database does the product reside on – SQL or Oracle? If it is cloud-based then where are the data centres located? Technology is all about research and development, so reinvestment in the product to keep it at the forefront of technology and forefront of functionality is vital.Source: Shutterstock/Sonpichit SalangsingTechnology companies need to have their finger on the pulse and understand exactly what the market requires of them from a technological, functional and compliance standpoint. That way they can develop the system functionality and provide the resource that is most relevant to this niche market.The accounts of the technology companies can make for very interesting reading. It’s always fascinating to see where they spend their money. Does it go into research and development or do the profits just get taken out every year?If due diligence is carried out before procuring the technology, it can go a long way in solving issues of accountability if expectations aren’t met down the line. That accountability lies both with the investor and the technology company.Financial outlaySome of the accountability must lie with the investors because they have to commit to it fully both financially and practically. They have to make the resources available to implement the system properly and that can mean a financial outlay. There’s a lot of out-of-date technology in the market and I don’t think a lot of people realise that. If they don’t fully commit to it, there will undoubtedly be problems that will continue to arise.Ultimately investment managers want the technology to help make informed strategic business decisions. It should help them gain more visibility of the investment journey to identify and mitigate risk and evolve the investment strategy.That means having sight of everything they own and information and data on everything that goes on around their portfolio – a single source of the truth, if you like. And you only get that with a single system.Watch: Talking Sheds – the distribution revolution (presented by PW & Yardi)It provides much more clarity if you have one source of data. If you have multiple systems and solutions you lose sight of what’s going on in your portfolio, which means you’re less informed, meaning your investors are less informed and perhaps more nervous as a result.It provides more quality and clarity when reporting back to investors, so using intuitive, personalised dashboards and portfolio information can make them see how their money is being put to work. There is nothing being hidden and investor and shareholder trust and credibility is gained.In order that investment managers get the optimum benefits from their technology, they unequivocally have to buy into it, carry out comprehensive due diligence, aim for a single supplier system and invest in resources to implement it properly.Mike Cook is regional solutions manager at YardiAbout YardiNow in its fourth decade, Yardi is committed to the design, development and support of software for real estate investment management and property management. With the Yardi Commercial Suite, Yardi Residential Suite, Yardi Investment Suite and Yardi Orion Business Intelligence, the Yardi Voyager platform is a complete real estate management solution. It includes operations, accounting and services with portfolio-wide business intelligence and platform-wide mobility. Yardi serves clients worldwide from offices in Australia, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and North America.last_img read more

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Couple Brings Vocal Chemistry To BBB Series

first_imgSag Harbor’s chamber music series “Bach, Before and Beyond” will enter its fifth season on October 27 at Old Whalers Church.Of course, Old Whalers artistic director Walter Klauss is not surprised. “We made it. We’re growing,” he said. Klauss had been an organist, conductor, and choir master for decades in the city. Now a resident of East Hampton, he sensed an appetite for year-round classical music on the East End that would feature singers adept at both the operatic and popular repertoire. And to judge from the increasing numbers who attend the standing-ovation BBB concerts, his intuition was correct.This fall, under Klauss’s direction, soprano Paige Cutrona and bass Jonathan Fox Powers will present “Bach to Broadway,” songs that will showcase an unusual collaboration for them and be a first for BBB, which hitherto has focused on solo performers or groups.Cutrona and Powers are not just a couple professionally, but personally. Although they met casually 10 years ago rehearsing “La Boheme,” Powers assumed a starring role in Cutrona’s life when they were both cast in Stephen Sondheim’s “Passion” at the Utopia Opera Company at Hunter College in 2018.Although they had seen each other over the years in various productions at the Amore Opera (the old Amato in the East Village), it was only in “Passion” that their own emerged: their first kiss was onstage.Though tenors usually get the girls, Powers will have a grand lower-voice time with his lady love at BBB doing classical and pop. Has their personal relationship affected the professional? Yes, but only in good ways, they say. Powers now studies with Cutrona’s teacher and finds himself asking for more feedback than he would if they were just colleagues.He describes himself as a “music theory nerd,” meaning he focuses on what’s special about a particular composition. “He can transpose keys,” Cutrona said, admiringly. “I can’t.” They both noted their respect and admiration for each other’s talent and the “egalitarian” quality of their relationship.The chemistry is real between them, both on and off stage.Cutrona, a lyric soprano, trained at Westminster Choir College in Princeton, NJ and earned her master’s in vocal performance from Carnegie Mellon University. An “enthusiast” of lesser known operas (“little gems”) as well as of the better-known repertory, she delights as well in taking on contemporary work, such as the international premiere of Paul Leavitt’s “Requiem” at Saint Sulpice in Paris.A magna-cum-laude graduate of SUNY Oswego, Powers is an accomplished pianist in addition to being a versatile bass who has performed with several New York opera companies. He adores Gilbert and Sullivan and notes that he recently created the role of Mr. Darcy for a musical adaptation of “Pride and Prejudice” for Theater for the New City. His credits also include music directing and accompanying.The October BBB concert, not incidentally, will close out Old Whalers’ 175th anniversary year. Of course, local history buffs know that a “house of public worship” has always served Sag Harbor residents, but it was only in May 1844 that the noted architect Minard Lafever finished building the iconic Egyptian Revival (with Greek-style elements) church on Union Street, 185-foot-high steeple and all — though the three-sectioned decorated tower fell in the Hurricane of 1938.Designated a National Historic Landmark in 1994, Old Whalers, also known as the First Presbyterian Church of Sag Harbor, and dedicated to serving community interests and needs, seems an ideal place to bring together the arts, past and present. The newly renovated organ, the oldest in a church on Long Island, boasts famous lineage, and the recent restoration of the sanctuary includes a knock-out trompe l’oeil wall behind the altar.Mark your calendars: Sunday, October 27, 3 PM. At Old Whalers Church. Tickets are available at the door or at Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor. Visit www.bachbeforeandbeyond.com. Sharelast_img read more

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Focus on sustainability

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Really really

first_imgDavid Kapp, Belthorn Estatewhen it comes to science and maths education.Are we still number 133 out of 142 countriesfor the poor quality of teachingmathematics science numeracyliteracy and primary school educationWe who wait for aNational Science Week to make it realaffording politiciansthe opportunity to showboatReally reallynew science laboratoriescome our way courtesyof UWC’s Science Learning Centrefor Africa – UWC-SLCAfor those into acronymsEmpowering and entrustingthe next generationof scientists and technologistsEntrusting the futureto the next generationafter all, science takes you placesgirls who wear pink canbecome scientists too justAs our boys wear their blueReally really Inspired by the Athlone News article, “New labs make science real for school kids,” Wednesday March 1.last_img read more

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Making things happen: lawyers or poets?

first_imgA recurring theme of my time at the International Bar Association (IBA) meeting in Dublin last week was the relationship between law and literature. It is appropriate that this should occur in Ireland, with its significant contribution to the English language canon. It began at the opening ceremony when the outgoing president of the IBA, Akira Kawamura from Japan, gave his presidential speech. This was an excellent presentation, one of the best from an IBA president – even if he did begin by declaring loudly ‘Welcome to Dubai!’ (the venue for last year’s IBA conference, with an unfortunate similarity in its first three letters). He quickly recovered, and taught me something about the relationship between Ireland and Japan. There was a a 19th-century Irish author called Lafcadio Hearn, who wrote Japanese fairy tales, ghost stories and legends, and is apparently known and beloved by generations of Japanese schoolchildren. The Japanese Post Office even issued a commemorative stamp in his honour on the centenary of his death in 2004. The theme continued at a conference dinner hosted by the Law Society of Ireland, where the Nobel laureate, Seamus Heaney, was the speaker. He gave an address entitled: ‘The Web and the World’. The title gives nothing away, but in essence it was a riposte to WH Auden’s line on the outbreak of the Second World War, contained in his heartbreakingly beautiful poem In Memory of WB Yeats: ‘For poetry makes nothing happen’. Seamus Heaney doubted that that was true. Interestingly, he was defensive in tone, assuming that lawyers definitely make things happen, but poets might not. The first question is whether lawyers make things happen in the sense that Auden meant it. Seamus Heaney assumed that we do because we handle cases that can change lives, affecting groups or sometimes even whole countries. But I could just as easily have written on the outbreak of the Second World War: ‘For lawyers make nothing happen’. The lawyers and judges of Germany had been killed, imprisoned, exiled, cowed or corrupted by the time that Hitler started his military manoeuvres in the late 1930s. I am not aware of a single law or lawyer that constrained him in his monstrous ambitions and killing sprees. Why do poets have to be so defensive? If I understood him correctly, Seamus Heaney’s defence of poetry lies in the way it is able to describe the unacceptable, to capture the absence of laws in a tyranny, say, and to provide the phrases and images that lead people towards formulating justice and the defence of human rights. He quoted the Swedish poet Tomas Tranströmer to that effect. That may be right, but it is part of a larger argument. In my view, poetry – which is not constrained by external reality to the same extent as a novel – is able to describe anything, particularly ideas which are just out of reach and not yet articulated, and to do so memorably because of two of its features, brevity and music. So, the present and the past can be illuminated by ideas. In effect, poets come first, and lawyers second as implementers. He did not quote Shelley’s famous saying that ‘poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world’ from his 1821 Defence of Poetry, but that was the subtext. It is good that a lawyers’ conference should provoke thoughts about our role. Overall, the IBA conference was well organised, extremely well attended and rewarding. But maybe, since art is my theme, I will put in a plea to the organisers to ditch the film which now traditionally starts the opening ceremony. It must cost thousands, and is a case of triumphalism gone mad. While still on the subject of the ceremony, I wish the organisers could just once have confidence in hiring a lawyer as keynote speaker rather than a non-lawyer celebrity (this year, Joseph Stiglitz), who – interesting as they are – do not contribute to the central debates taking place in our profession. I shall end with law and literature. At a time when Europe is facing its next great crisis, there was a session at the conference on ‘The euro area crisis – thinking the unthinkable’, which dealt with the legal consequences of possible future developments. Lawyers will follow whatever events emerge, and help to repair the consequences. I do not mean to be disloyal to my chosen profession, but here is the ending to WH Auden’s poem about WB Yeats mentioned above, with its specific call to the role of poets in such times: ‘In the nightmare of the dark All the dogs of Europe bark, And the living nations wait, Each sequestered in its hate; Intellectual disgrace Stares from every human face, And the seas of pity lie Locked and frozen in each eye. Follow, poet, follow right To the bottom of the night, With your unconstraining voice Still persuade us to rejoice; With the farming of a verse Make a vineyard of the curse, Sing of human unsuccess In a rapture of distress; In the deserts of the heart Let the healing fountain start, In the prison of his days Teach the free man how to praise.’ Jonathan Goldsmith is secretary general of the Council of Bars and Law Societies of Europe, which represents around a million European lawyers through its member bars and law societies. He blogs weekly for the Gazette on European affairslast_img read more

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Freshfields and Slaughters give way on pay gap

first_imgThe gender pay gap across the entire workforce at magic circle firms Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer and Slaughter and May has been revealed after demands from a committee of MPs.Freshfields reported a mean pay gap of 60.4% when partners are included; at Slaughter and May it was 61.8%.Both firms declined to include partners when reporting their pay gap data under the Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations earlier this year on the grounds that the legislation requires only employees’ pay to be compared. With partners not included the pay gap at Freshfields was 13.9% while at Slaughters it was 14.3%.The revision of the figures follows a request from the House of Commons’ Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Committee for each of the five magic circle firms to incorporate partners into their data. At an evidence session last month, Slaughter and May’s head of HR, Louise Meikle, was critcised by the committee for the omission of partners.Linklaters and Clifford Chance had already included partners in their gender pay gap reports. Allen & Overy, which comes in for particular criticism from the committee, was alone in not reporting its data. The firm previously told the Gazette it will report this information in September.The debate over whether partners should be included was sparked by the ‘big four’ professional services firms, KPMG, EY, PwC and Deloitte, who all revised data following comments by Lloyd’s of London chief executive Inga Beale and Law Society vice president Christina Blacklaws.Rachel Reeves, chair of the BEIS Committee, said today: ‘It will surprise no-one that including partners in reporting reveals a wider gender pay gap. The picture wasn’t a pretty one but the big four firms at least acknowledged the problem by including partner data, a social duty which somehow escaped, with some exceptions, the major law firms.’She added: ‘A&O can’t even come clean on its partner data now. It’s easy to talk the talk on diversity and inclusion but if a business is dragging its feet on providing even basic information about its gender pay gap then it begs the question of how seriously it takes its responsibilities to valuing all its staff and how dedicated it is to committing to promote female associates to partner level.’In its letter A&O said it was committed to supporting women at work and ensuring they progress their career at the firm.The published letters also include details on the proportion of female associates and female partners at the firms. Clifford Chance revealed that since 2010 promotions to partners were 33% female and 66.7% male. Freshfields said that since 2015, 42% of partner promotions have gone to women.last_img read more

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