Category: vunmcmuz

Which businesses are thriving in the downturn?

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BPF welcomes government plans to regenerate sink estates

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Plans unveiled for symmetry park Wigan

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Zeroing in on the key climate issues

first_imgDuring a question-and-answer session, Fisher also conceded that there could be a conflict between the desire to create net zero workplaces and the industry’s increasing awareness of wellbeing in offices.He explained that a desire to promote staff wellbeing can often lead to a lot of air being pushed through a building to make sure that it is neither too cold nor too hot. However, this requires a lot of energy, so net zero buildings will need to take a different approach. The solution, according to Fisher, is to design buildings that allow for the natural flow of air.Basil Demeroutis, managing partner at FORE Partnership, said the biggest roadblock the industry faces when tackling the climate crisis is the lack of a common language to address the issues.During a 10-minute TED-style talk, Demeroutis argued that the language of the sustainability movement needs updating. “We’re clutching at ideas and there’s no common language to show us what ‘good’ looks like,” he argued.Demeroutis suggested that a change in language and system were required to foster a more holistic approach that reflects how each part of the acronym ‘ESG’ (environmental, social and governance) is connected.“We don’t worry about carbon on Tuesdays and community on Wednesdays, like some giant game of whack-a-mole,” he said, explaining that the problems need to be looked at – and tackled – as part of a system.No common languageIn the final part of the event, Lorna Walker, co-founder of Modomo; Claudine Blamey, head of sustainability at Argent; Omega Poole, partnerat Mishcon de Reya; and Sophie Chick, director of world research at Savills, took part in an online debate chaired by Property Week editor Liz Hamson on the challenges and opportunities facing the net-zero carbon movement.Blamey began by saying the industry should heed Demeroutis’s advice on the need for holistic system change, arguing that for developers, this means focusing on embodied carbon first and foremost.Poole agreed, adding that the biggest challenge was shifting the industry away from building developments that create more embodied carbon and towards retrofitting existing stock to make it net zero. His first example was one from the past: the Wessex Water HQ in Bath, designed by Bennetts Associates and completed in 2000. At the time, it was one of the most sustainable buildings in the UK. Encouragingly, Fisher noted that if the gas boilers were replaced with electric air source heating pumps, the building could meet the UKGBC’s net zero carbon targets.“The simple, robust, passive measures of buildings like Wessex Water HQ are still relevant today, and that has informed much of what we have done in the past few years,” said Fisher.Fisher also noted that materials such as cross-laminated timber can be used to reduce embodied carbon emissions, which make up between 30% and 70% of a building’s lifetime emissions, according to a 2015 UKGBC report. He argued that this material also gives a building a “much more material and visceral quality, which ultimately creates a nicer place to work”.Net zero challengeOne challenge future occupiers will face as they try to make their buildings net zero carbon emitting is the potential for energy usage to increase in the future. Fisher said that about a quarter of energy use in office buildings comes from IT, onsite servers and associated cooling, which businesses may increasingly depend on as they place greater emphasis on homeworking after lockdown restrictions are lifted. He added that cloud computing, which uses less energy, could be a solution to this problem. However, the success of Property Week’s Climate Crisis Challenge virtual event Net Zero: The Art of the Possible, hosted in collaboration with UKGBC and partners Argent, Mishcon de Reya and Savills, shows that if anything, the industry has more desire than ever to tackle the climate crisis.During the hour-and-a-half event held online on Tuesday 9 June, representatives from across the industry talked about what net zero emissions really mean and how likely it is that real estate will be able to hit this target.The event began with Property Week editor Liz Hamson and UKGBC chief executive Julie Hirigoyen discussing the results of Property Week’s recent Climate Crisis Challenge Perceptions Survey, which revealed that more than 90% of the real estate professionals polled wanted stricter regulations to tackle the climate crisis, but less than half felt their businesses were equipped to combat it.What’s more, 92% of respondents agreed that tackling the climate crisis mattered to them personally, but 40% did not know whether their business had a strategy to tackle it. Source: AlamyGreen pioneer: the Bennetts Associates-designed Wessex Water HQ in Bath was one of the UK’s most sustainable buildings when it opened in 2000When asked what one change they would like the industry to make to address the crisis, respondents called for stricter minimum energy efficiency standards, the decarbonisation of building stock and mandatory carbon budgets for all buildings.Hirigoyen said the results underlined the industry’s change in attitude towards the global climate crisis.“We’re really seeing a shift from ‘Why should I bother doing it?’ to ‘How do I do it?’” she said, adding that she was pleased to discover that most of the respondents of the survey were senior – over 65% were at partner, director, chief executive or chairman level.Positive signsHirigoyen was also encouraged by the fact that a third of the 200 major companies that recently signed a letter to the prime minister urging the government to invest in a green recovery prioritising “low-carbon innovation, infrastructure and industries” were members of UKGBC.As hopeful as she was, Hirigoyen also noted that the lockdown has shown how far the industry still has to go.Even with the pandemic causing GDP to plunge by more than 20%, according to ONS data published last month, the International Energy Agency is only predicting an 8% fall in carbon emissions for this year. Hirigoyen noted that this is a fraction of what is needed if the industry is to achieve net-zero carbon emissions.Hirigoyen defined a net zero carbon building as one that over its entire lifecycle, from material sourcing to construction to operation, emits no more carbon into the atmosphere than it has taken in, through generating more clean, renewable energy or investing in technologies that suck carbon out from the atmosphere.“Only a handful of buildings in the UK can credibly be called net zero carbon at the moment,” she said, highlighting the scale of the challenge the industry faces.One of the rare examples of a carbon neutral building being developed in the UK is 25 Lavington Street in Southwark. During a PechaKucha session, the project’s architect, Peter Fisher, a director at Bennetts Associates, explained how net zero carbon buildings work in practice. “Any new buildings should meet high standards of sustainability,” she said. “But we should absolutely be focusing on the existing stock.”She argued that businesses needed to be a lot more aspirational in their net zero commitments. It was relatively easy to make a building net zero carbon producing operationally, Poole said. All people need to do is pick up the phone to an energy supplier and ask for all electricity to come from zero carbon sources.“We’re not being as ambitious as we could be,” Poole said. “There’s no need to hold back on making changes now.”Modomo’s Walker also believed that more could be done, arguing that the problem was much larger than energy use and that the industry needed to look at becoming part of ‘the circular economy’, in which waste is reduced by recycling and making full use of sustainable materials.“The intent is now there,” she said. “As an industry, we’ve done an incredible amount in a short period of time – in just 12 to 18 months. We need to keep the energy up now that we know we want to do it and be bold over the next 12 to 18 months.”More ambition neededWalker agreed that more ambition is needed in the industry, pointing to her own company’s target of becoming net zero by 2025 instead of 2030. She added that shaving five years off of the more standard industry target would help to emphasise the urgency of the issue.Savills’ Chick also felt that companies should be bolder, noting that the problem was larger than individual buildings in individual countries.She argued that the differences in attitudes towards the climate crisis in countries around the world needed to be addressed by global companies, and noted that while many countries in Europe have declared a climate emergency, many countries elsewhere – including the US – have not.“By putting sustainability at the forefront of their global strategy, global companies can help overcome these local differences in attitudes,” she said.Referring back to Demeroutis’s idea of system change, Chick argued that developers needed to look at the layout of cities rather than their individual developments.As lockdowns are lifted, she said that it would be the perfect time to start building self-sufficient communities – where everything a resident could need was within a 15-minute radius – to cut down on unnecessary travel and reduce emissions.As Chick’s vision of a 15-minute community shows, the industry is not short of ideas. And, as the Property Week Climate Crisis Challenge Perceptions Survey shows, the industry is also not short on awareness about the issue – with 92% saying it matters to them personally.If individuals and businesses across real estate can combine those ideas with that concern, 2020 could yet be the year that the industry realises the art of the possible on net zero carbon and starts to truly rise to the Climate Crisis Challenge.last_img read more

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Air Products results: Q1 income rises

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Linde to showcase at FORMNEXT 2018

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Enjoy a feast of engineering wonder

first_imgSTAFF REPORTERThe Cape Town Society of Model and Experimental Engineers (CTSMEE) is holding its annual fundraiser and open day on Saturday and Sunday May 21 and 22.The club is situated in Rondebosch on the corner of Erin, Duke and Campground roads in Croquet Lane, behind the Rondebosch Croquet Club.The club will be open to the public from 9am to 4pm. The entry fee will be R20 an adult and R5 for children. Children under the age of five enter free. The money raised will be used for maintenance of the club house and to fund the various sections of the club with their projects.There will be R5 rides for the children on the five-inch gauge live steam engine. This locomotive is owned by the club’s vice chairman André van Breda. The rides will be between 9am and noon and then from 1.30pm to 3.30pm. This allows for maintenance of the locomotive.The club has a fully equipped workshop with lathes, milling machines and a shaper. There will be members carrying out engineering tasks to demonstrate to the public how the equipment functions.The following can be seen in the main hall:* The N Gauge Modular section will be displaying their show model which will be fully operational.* AZ Gauge Lay out on loan from Model Rail Road Specialists will be displayed which will be fully operational. This is the smallest gauge which is available.* The Model Rail Road Information Group will be displaying the HO Gauge replica of the Bot River Station, which is situated in the town of Bot River in the Overberg.* Shaun le Roux from Cape Model Trains will be displaying various items of South African Railway equipment and memorabilia which will also be for sale.* Steve Norman from Bestoys will be displaying model cars which will also be for sale. On the veranda, the Wood Turners Club will be demonstrating how to turn pieces of wood into useable objects. For more information about the club, call Ken Lindeman on 071 384 1344 or André van Breda on 082 378 2437.last_img read more

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Metros January 2004

first_imgAustralia: Victoria’s Transport Minister Peter Batchelor plans to sign a new Melbourne tram franchise imminently. It is expected that Yarra Trams will operate the entire network following the withdrawal of NationalExpress.Brazil: Technical and economic bids are due on January 6 from six shortlisted companies to carry out a feasibility study for Line 6 of the Rio de Janeiro metro. Costing US$1·02bn, the 35 km route connecting Tom Jobim airport and Barra de Tijuca with Duque de Caxias would open in 2009.Canada: Lake City Way station in Burnaby on Vancouver SkyTrain’s Millennium line opened on November 21.China: Shanghai metro Line 5 opened on November 25. A total of 22 locally-assembled Alstom Metropolis trainsets will be used on the 17·2 km elevated route, which links Line 1 at Xinzhuang with Minhang development zone.Hong Kong MTR has ordered a Motorola Compact Tetra radio system for public address and train communications on the Tung Chung line.Czech Republic: On November 29 regular services began over the 3·6 km extension of Praha’s tram network from Hlubocepy to Barrandov, built by Subterra and ZS Brno at a cost of KC2·1bn. Future plans include a KC1·3bn order for 20 new trams, and an extension to Malesice.France: A public enquiry has approved plans to extend Strasbourg’s light rail network by 13·5 km between December 2006 and June 2008 at a cost of €400m. Work is due to begin this year on the programme, which would also involve the creation of Line E.India: According to West Bengal Minister for Transport Subhas Chakraborty, an American and a Japanese company have expressed interest in a Rs20bn proposal to develop an 85 km commuter line through Kolkata linking Roychowk with Naihati.International: The most recent full members to join Alamys, the Latin American Association of Metros, are Transportes Ferroviarios de Madrid, Euskotren, Central and Supervia from Rio de Janeiro, and Tramvia from Barcelona. New associate members are Thales, Casesa, Alcatel, Necso, Mayser, Citef-Auxitec and Ardanuy.South Korea: A 51bn won contract for an underground peoplemover at Incheon International Airport was awarded to Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Sumitomo Corp and LG Industrial Systems on November 26. Opening in late 2008, the 900m line will have three rubber-tyred three-car trainsets.USA: Bus operator Metro Transit has been selected to operate the Hiawatha light rail line in Minneapolis, expected to open in April. Lower insurance costs helped the public operator’s $9m bid for three years win against three private-sector offers.Opening of the 5 km Canal Street tramway in New Orleans has been delayed by three months from the scheduled date of December 6 to allow road resurfacing to be completed.San Diego Association of Governments has selected a final alignment for the proposed 17·2 km Mid-Coast extension of San Diego Trolley north from the Old Town Transit Center to University City in La Jolla, expected to cost up to $677m.Uzbekistan: The Kirov Tramcar Works at Ust-Katav in Russia is to supply 50 trams to the city of Toshkent.last_img read more

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Young Railway Professionals celebration draws a full house

first_imgUK: The fourth Annual Dinner-Dance to be held in London by networking group Young Railway Professionals drew a sell-out attendance of more than 400 guests on March 14.The audience heard a keynote address by Crossrail Chairman Terry Morgan, who recounted his experience of working his way up the career path across several industries in a variety of roles, having started out as an automotive apprentice. Morgan recounted a meeting with the owner of the tunnel boring machine manufacturer Herrenknecht AG when Crossrail received the first of its eight TBMs. ‘He told me that he never worried about the quality of his machinery, but he worried about where the engineers to operate them would come from in the future – and he added that British engineers are the most skilled TBM operators out there’, Morgan recalled. He then issued a reminder that overt support for major projects would be essential to sustain the training and professional development needed for young people to enjoy a long, successful career. YRP also handed out its inaugural Young Professional of the Year award, sponsored by infrastructure contractor Colas Rail Ltd. Winner Lucy McAuliffe of Network Rail was praised by YRP Chairman Martyn Chymera for her ‘level of commitment and dedication to the railway industry’; she is a station manager overseeing a team of more than 150 staff at London St Pancras and the High Speed 1 intermediate stations at Ebbsfleet and Stratford. McAuliffe’s additional work as an assessor for NR’s Track and Train pan-industry graduate programme was also reflected by the award. Held at the Grand Connaught Rooms in London, the event was sponsored by CPC Project Services.last_img read more

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The Masked Singer – our latest guesses after episode 5

first_imgUnicornThe clues: Unicorn says that performing is a passion but he also loves to write. He loves fantasy and horror. Unicorn has written words for other people including Sarah Jessica Parker.Previous clues: Unicorn claimed not to know who John Barrowman was but said ‘fabulous’ which is Barrowman’s catchphrase. He said he grew up on a small island but was drawn to the bright lights. That adds to last week’s clues that he was LGBTQ, a show pony and that he flew on a private jet for family holidays.Our guess: Jake Shears. We’ve moved from John Barrowman after a reader gave us a theory that makes a lot of sense. The Sarah Jessica Parker clue could refer to when SJP covered Let’s Have a Kiki, a Scissor Sisters song, on Glee. Jake has also written an autobiography and songs for Kylie Minogue. OctopusThe clues: Octopus suggested that she’s a tourist in London and spends time on beaches. She’s not always in her natural habitat but she has her wellies for the beach, in the Dales and the city. Has been known to visit dangerous locations, such as a jungle, and takes ‘serious fishnets’ to do what she’s done.Previous clues: Octopus suggested she was a singer and that she’d signed a £1,000,000 record deal. There was a photo of Jason Donovan visible in her bag and she suggested she may have been on The Apprentice. She also referenced things going ‘swimmingly’. The previous clues were that she was bubbly, happy-go-lucky and always on the go. She would like to be a role model and could possibly be a model. She always likes weight training.Our guess: Myleene Klass. We’re completely and utterly thrown by this one but talking to the team, Myleene might fit. She was in I’m a Celebrity with Jason Donovan and has performed with Jason on TV. After Hear’Say she’s straddled the worlds of pop and classical too. The Masked Singer continues Saturday at 7pm on ITV. Queen BeeThe clues: Queen Bee has always loved using her voice but is naturally shy. She won a contest, which launched her career when she was young, and she felt swept away by the tide and thrown in at the deep end. Queen Bee has been centre stage at some big venues.Previous clues: Queen Bee gets a buzz from looking after other people and using her voice for good. She’s thought of as shy but always stands up for what she believes in and has made a difference. Queen Bee is a law maker and considers herself benevolent. She was also seen beating a drum. Last week she said she started her career young and was a bit of a wildcard.Our guess: Nicola Roberts. We’ve been convinced that Queen Bee is Girls Aloud star Nicola Roberts since the very first week. The clues further support that, especially the part about a contest launching her career. Rita guessed it was Nicola too and Girl on Fire surely is a nod to Nicola’s hair colour? The Masked Singer continued last night, which meant we’ve had another game of guessing who is the under the masks.This week’s episode solidified many of our guesses but it also threw us on a couple of of the celebs. The clues are coming so thick and fast, and in some instances they seem to be contradicting what we thought we knew.Donny Osmond joined the panel this week to replace Ken Jeong, but he didn’t add a whole lot of great guesses. Davina McCall and Rita Ora were much closer we think and given Jonathan Ross guessed Natalie Cole, who died in 2015, we’re just going to ignore him.Keep reading to find out who we think each of the masked singers is… MonsterThe clues: Monster said he used to be a giant and that he comes from a big family. He was encouraged by a relative who hear him singing in the shower. Monster says he has a big family and grandkids.Previous clues: Always trying to be a bit of a showman who lives in the spotlight. Loved books as a child but can also be a real little monster. Discovered his love for rock and roll while growing up and plays the bass. Inspired by glam rock and likes doing his own thing. Previous clues included that Monster was a big personality with big muscles that has come to the UK. He said he doesn’t want to blow his own trumpet but he’s won many awards. After his performance he revealed that his hero is Spandau Ballet’s Tony Hadley.Our guess: CeeLo Green. We’re not sure about the big family and grandkids bit but CeeLo did write and produce the Pussycat Dolls song Don’t Cha, which he performed on the show last night. We’re not budging on this one. DuckThe clues: Duck likes to be liberal with her talents and she’s used her voice to help others. She believes everything is political and credits Judi Dench with getting her into Shakespeare.Previous clues: Duck speaks German and Italian, and was seen having a pizza delivered to her. 850,000 once sang Happy Birthday to her and she sang Happy Birthday to someone important once. Last week she said she used to be a long-distance runner but hinted she wasn’t a singer by trade so we think we may have got that clue wrong. She always likes surfing.Our guess: Skin from Skunk Anansie. If nothing else, her voice is so recognisable, it can’t possibly be anyone else. We didn’t know she could do operatic singing but that husky tone is without a doubt her. FoxThe clues: Fox says that clothes have played a big part in her life, she likes being glam and dancing with her girl friends. She said a broken heel led to her big break and she revealed that she’s crafty.Previous clues: Fox was seen tap dancing and made a few references to dancing. She’s always followed her own path and has broken records. There was a US flag shown during the VT and Fox said she was going to blow everyone away. Previous clues include street smart and nosy, can be a bit of a party animal and can be seen slinking around the East End from time-to-time. The additional clue was Fox has been collecting tea pots for 30 years.Our guess: Denise Van Outen. We’re not budging on this one either. If this isn’t Denise Van Outen, we’ll eat our hats. All of the clues point to Denise and even Davina guessed it might be her this week. ChameleonIn episode 3 Chameleon was unmasked and revealed to be The Darkness frontman Justin Hawkins. Who has been unmasked?ButterflyIn episode 1 Butterfly was unmasked and revealed to be former EastEnders actress Patsy Palmer. PharaohIn episode 2 Pharaoh was unmasked and revealed to be ex-Labour MP Alan Johnson. TreeIn episode 4 Tree was unmasked and revealed to be former footballer Teddy Sheringham.DaisyIn episode 5 Daisy was unmasked and revealed to be singer Kelis. HedgehogThe clues: Hedgehog never imagined that he’d be a performer. He’s played to a variety of people over the years and always looked up to people like Billy Connolly. Hedgehog sings 8 shows a week and can’t believe the places where his career has taken him.Previous clues: Hedgehog enjoys being part of a team and likes being part of an ensemble. A can of hairspray and models of cats were seen along with a Phantom of the Opera mask. He mentioned having a ‘ball’ and bringing the house down. Last week he said he was most active at night and his natural habitat is on stage. He also said he’s a workaholic and he used to die at 8.30pm ever night.Our guess: Michael Ball. We’re not as convinced on this one as we were but the clues do still seem to fit. The voice wasn’t a great fit for Oasis’ Don’t Look Back in Anger though and didn’t sound as strong as previous weeks.last_img read more

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